Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Category: Policy

Lee: With Kim Jong Il Dead, a Chance to Normalize Inter-Korean Relations

Kim Il Sung (L) and Kim Jong Il are pictured in this piece of propaganda art photographed in North Korea. (Flickr/yeowatzup)
Policy

Kim Jong Il is dead. While it is never clear whether history creates a leader, or a leader creates history, one thing is clear: The more a leader dominates power over a nation, the more its regime's fate will be changed by that leader’s death. So where is North Korea headed after Kim Jong Il’s death?

2011: A Return to Roots? Lessons From This Year's US Engagement in Asia

U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd R) applauds with Southeast Asian leaders, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (L), Philippines President Benigno Aquino (2nd L) and Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah (R), during a group photo session for the leaders of the East Asia Summit in Nusa Dua on Indonesia's resort island of Bali on November 19, 2011 following the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit. (Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

This is part of a series of year-end posts on Asia Blog written by Asia Society experts and Associate Fellows looking back on noteworthy events in 2011. You can read the entire series here.

Lho: Helping North Korea Escape From a 'Self-Imposed Hell'

Located in Seoul, the War Memorial of Korea was opened in 1994 on the former site of Korean Army headquarters. (Wilson Loo/Flickr)
Policy

There is an old Korean saying that even rivers and mountains change in the space of a decade. And much has changed in the past six decades since the bloody, three-year long conflagration left the Korean peninsula in ashes, having proved little beyond the fact that another such war must be prevented at all costs.

2011: Three Big Stories Out of India You'll Hear More About in 2012

Indians cheer at an Anna Hazare anti-corruption rally in New Delhi on Aug. 24, 2011. (India Kangaroo/Flickr)
Policy

Corruption, agricultural woes and nuclear power will continue to roil India's body politic in the year ahead, according to Mira Kamdar.

2011: A Year Sans Global Leadership

On top? Chinese Yuan notes photographed in March 2011. China pointedly declined to provide direct financial assistance to Europe in late 2011. (Flickr/Sharon Drummond)
Policy

Though it wasn't always obvious, the main international migraine of this year was the European debt crisis. The crisis left the station in 2009 and was rolling all through 2010, but it really picked up steam this year. In effect, 2011 was the year it went from being about Greece to being about Europe and, potentially, the world as a whole.

2011: South Korea's Lee Myung-bak is One Man Washington Can Agree On

In Washington, Lee Myung-bak (L), President of the Republic of Korea, begins his address to Congress, with Vice President Joe Biden and Speaker John Boehner (R) behind him, on Oct. 13, 2011. (Flickr/SpeakerBoehner)
Policy

Americans say in poll after poll that they yearn for a leader who will come to Washington, cut through the gridlock, and get the nation’s business done. This year, that leader arrived — South Korean President Lee Myung-bak.

Whiting: During This DPRK Changeover, South Koreans Not Hoarding Rice

Residents walk past newspapers showing the late North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il and his son Kim Jong-Un outside a convenience store in Seoul on December 20, 2011. (Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

When long-time North Korean dictator Kim Il Sung died in 1994, nervous South Koreans rushed to the stores and hoarded basic necessities such as rice, canned meat and instant noodles in fear of another Korean War. The "Great Leader" was dead and his son, Kim Jong Il was taking over. This was uncharted territory.

Lee: 'Nasty Palace Politics and Back Stabbing' Could Destroy Kim Jong Un

A street peddler shows the North Korean bank notes featuring late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il along the waterfront of Yalu river in Dandong, in China's northeastern Liaoning province on December 20, 2011. (Liu Jin/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

On the surface, North Korea is calmly coping with the sudden death of its Dear Leader Kim Jong Il. His youngest son and heir, Kim Jong Un, seems to be in charge, smoothly preparing a state funeral for the 28th. Pyongyang media already call him “The Great Successor.”

French: Why Kim Jong Un Should Mourn Until 2013

Kim Jong Un (C), dubbed the
Policy

Paul French, author of North Korea: The Paranoid Peninsula, says "we shouldn't expect anything of substance to come out of Pyongyang for a year."

Gilholm: Kim Jong Il's Death Reduces Regime's Life Expectancy

A portrait of the late Kim Jong Il in Pyongyang, North Korea. (Joseph A Ferris III/Flickr)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's reported death on December 17 is the biggest shock to the country's regime since the passing of his father in 1994. Forecasting what will happen to an authoritarian regime after a leadership succession is inherently rather speculative, and nowhere is this more true than in North Korea. However, we can venture a few observations, and in very broad terms estimate the probability of various types of scenarios.