Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Category: Policy

2011: Will Japan's Leaders Squander Post-Disaster Goodwill?

John Dicola (R) of the U.S. Navy assists in removing debris during a cleanup effort at the Misawa Fishing Port in Japan on March 14, 2011. Photo by Devon Dow. (Flickr/U.S. Pacific Fleet)
Policy

The world may admire Japan's resolve, but unless the country's leaders get their act together "it’s hard to see a bright future," writes Ayako Doi.

2011: Five Big China Stories (That Didn't Happen in China)

What do riots in London mean to leaders in Beijing? (Flickr/rorymizen)
Policy

It is crucial not to overlook things that happen elsewhere that change the state of play within Chinese political life, writes Jeffrey Wasserstrom.

Hassan Abbas: 'How Obama Can Fix U.S.-Pakistani Relations'

Local Pakistani kids await to be evacuated on a CH-60 Blackhawk in Khyber - Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, on Sept. 13, 2010. Photo By Joshua Kruger. (Flickr/DVIDSHUB)
Policy

As Pakistan struggles with its democratic transition, Asia Society Senior Advisor Hassan Abbas writes in Foreign Affairs that Obama can help Pakistan help itself by taking a less unilateral approach and focusing instead on strengthening Pakistan's civilian government and investing in civil society. Abbas points out: 

Jae-Seung Lee: The Moment of Truth for the Two Koreas

(Flickr/mag3737)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's death has created a critical opportunity for the two Koreas to figure out a roadmap for the coming years, writes Korea University's Jae-Seung Lee.

Vishakha Desai: Will Asia Be One?

Statue of Indian poet, playwright, musician, and artist Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) at Tagore House in Kolkata. (kittell/Flickr)
Policy

A century after leading intellectuals first articulated a notion of Asian identity, writes Asia Society's President, it has the potential to become true.

Lee: With Kim Jong Il Dead, a Chance to Normalize Inter-Korean Relations

Kim Il Sung (L) and Kim Jong Il are pictured in this piece of propaganda art photographed in North Korea. (Flickr/yeowatzup)
Policy

Kim Jong Il is dead. While it is never clear whether history creates a leader, or a leader creates history, one thing is clear: The more a leader dominates power over a nation, the more its regime's fate will be changed by that leader’s death. So where is North Korea headed after Kim Jong Il’s death?

2011: A Return to Roots? Lessons From This Year's US Engagement in Asia

U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd R) applauds with Southeast Asian leaders, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (L), Philippines President Benigno Aquino (2nd L) and Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah (R), during a group photo session for the leaders of the East Asia Summit in Nusa Dua on Indonesia's resort island of Bali on November 19, 2011 following the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit. (Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

This is part of a series of year-end posts on Asia Blog written by Asia Society experts and Associate Fellows looking back on noteworthy events in 2011. You can read the entire series here.

Lho: Helping North Korea Escape From a 'Self-Imposed Hell'

Located in Seoul, the War Memorial of Korea was opened in 1994 on the former site of Korean Army headquarters. (Wilson Loo/Flickr)
Policy

There is an old Korean saying that even rivers and mountains change in the space of a decade. And much has changed in the past six decades since the bloody, three-year long conflagration left the Korean peninsula in ashes, having proved little beyond the fact that another such war must be prevented at all costs.

2011: Three Big Stories Out of India You'll Hear More About in 2012

Indians cheer at an Anna Hazare anti-corruption rally in New Delhi on Aug. 24, 2011. (India Kangaroo/Flickr)
Policy

Corruption, agricultural woes and nuclear power will continue to roil India's body politic in the year ahead, according to Mira Kamdar.

2011: A Year Sans Global Leadership

On top? Chinese Yuan notes photographed in March 2011. China pointedly declined to provide direct financial assistance to Europe in late 2011. (Flickr/Sharon Drummond)
Policy

Though it wasn't always obvious, the main international migraine of this year was the European debt crisis. The crisis left the station in 2009 and was rolling all through 2010, but it really picked up steam this year. In effect, 2011 was the year it went from being about Greece to being about Europe and, potentially, the world as a whole.