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Category: Policy

Experts Weigh in on Memogate and the Possibility of a Coup in Pakistan

Pakistani security personnel stand guard outside the Supreme Court building during a hearing in Islamabad on Jan. 19, 2012. (Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The Memogate scandal that broke in October 2011 led to resignations, increased anti-Americanism, and now... a potential coup in Pakistan?

Just How Deep Do Myanmar's Changes Run?

Aung San Suu Kyi (C) registers to run as a candidate in upcoming by-elections at the Thanlyin township election commission office on the outskirts of Yangon on Jan. 18, 2012. (Soe Than Win/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Despite a stunning series of developments in recent weeks, some informed Burma watchers are counseling skepticism.

DiMaggio: U.S. Myanmar Changes 'Right Move at the Right Time'

Burmese democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi (C) poses recently at her offices in Yangon with Asia Society Vice President of Global Policy Programs Suzanne DiMaggio (R) and Asia Society Senior Advisor Priscilla Clapp.
Policy

The United States has shown the government of Myanmar that it is ready to react quickly to concrete reforms, writes Asia Society's Suzanne DiMaggio.

Desai: Myanmar Changes 'a Welcome Sign'

Myanmar political prisoner Kyaw Min Yu (C), known as Jimmy, and his wife Ni Lar Thein (L) holding her child, both members of the 88 Generation student group, celebrate upon their arrival at Yangon international airport following their release from detention on January 13, 2012. Myanmar pardoned prominent dissidents, journalists and a former premier on January 13 under a major prisoner amnesty, intensifying a surprising series of reforms by the army-backed regime. (Soe Than Win/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society President Vishakha Desai reacts to a historic day of change in Myanmar.

Video: Rudd Sees 'Real Constituency for Change' in Burma

Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd at Asia Society in New York on January 13, 2012. (Asia Society/Bill Swersey)
Policy

Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd says "until we have evidence that it's going to slide in the other direction" foreign nations need to open up to Burma.

Kevin Rudd on Australia's Unique Role in U.S.-China Relations [Gallery/Video]

Policy

In a wide-ranging speech, peppered with Mandarin phrases, Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd touched on history and culture as much as contemporary politics to propose a new "rules-based" way for Asia to accommodate Sino-U.S. rivalries. He calls it "Pax Pacifica."

Video: Aung San Suu Kyi says Burma 'on the Verge of a Breakthrough to Democracy'

Aung San Suu Kyi. (Drn/Getty Images)
Policy

Burmese democracy icon Aung San Suu Kyi was awarded the Global Vision Award at the Asia Society Awards Dinner earlier this evening at the Waldorf=Astoria in New York City. Unable to leave Burma, Daw Aung accepted the award via a recorded video message, which you can watch below.

Orville Schell's Top 5 Books on China and the West

Orville Schell (R) speaks to Damian Woetzl (L) and Yo Yo Ma at the opening ceremony of the US-China Forum on the Arts and Culture in Beijing on Nov. 17, 2011. (Dong Lin)
Policy

As China rises to power in a tumultuous political and economic environment, the U.S. finds itself struggling to build a relationship with its greatest rival. Perhaps the biggest challenge in this international bridge-building is the conflict between traditional Western and Eastern ways of thinking.

Kevin Rudd and Australia's Role in the 'Asia Pacific Century'

Kevin Rudd, Foreign Minister of Australia. (Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Australia's foreign minister is speaking at the Asia Society in New York on Friday, January 11, 2012. Whether or not most Australians identify themselves as "Asian," the country's future is directly tied to its neighbors to the north, writes Andrew Billo.

What Will Hu Jintao Think of 'Titanic 3D'?

The original 'Titanic' was a big hit in mainland China. Will its upcoming 3D release be seen by Chinese leaders as a
Policy

The Chinese leader's recent "cultural war" seems to be part of an unpleasant “new normal” for China, in which any excuse can be used to justify a tightening of control, writes Jeffrey Wasserstrom.