Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Category: Food & Recipes

The Wonderful World of Korean Food: Liquors and Wines

Soju (<a href=riNux/flickr)" src="http://asiasociety.org/files/imagecache/small/soju.jpg">
Food & Recipes Traditional Korean drink is made chiefly from rice, other grains, sweet potatoes, etc., usually with kneaded wheat malt. They are classified according to purity, percentage of alcohol contained, whether or not distilled, and materials used. There are largely five types: yakju (refined pure liquor fermented from rice), soju (distilled liquor), takju (thick, unrefined liquor fermented from grains), fruit wines, and medicinal wines from various seeds and roots. Each type has dozens of varieties.

The Wonderful World of Korean Food: Kimchi

Photo by <a href=Nagyman/flickr" src="http://asiasociety.org/files/imagecache/small/worldofkoreanfood_kichi.jpg">
Food & Recipes

Kimchi is a fermented vegetable dish allowing long storage. In the past, Koreans used to prepare it as a substitute for fresh vegetables during the winter months. Today, housewives still prepare a large amount of winter kimchi, somewhere from late November through early December. This nationwide annual event is called gimjang.

The Wonderful World of Korean Food: Traditional Teas

Tea ceremony (<a href=hojusaram/flickr)" src="http://asiasociety.org/files/imagecache/small/koreatea.jpg">
Food & Recipes

Traditional Korean Teas

The Wonderful World of Korean Food: Types of Korean Food

Deji-galbi-jjim (<a href=gunpodo7/flickr)" src="http://asiasociety.org/files/imagecache/small/jjim.jpg">
Food & Recipes Types of Korean Food

Jeon
(pan-fried dishes)
Mushroom, zucchini, fish fillet, oyster, or green pepper with ground meat filling are thinly coated with flour, dipped in a beaten egg, and then pan-fried. There are also pancake-type jeon: mung bean powder, wheat flour or grated potato is used to make batter, and green onion, kimchi, or chopped pork are stirred in, then fried.

Jjim and Jorim
(simmered meat or fish)

The Wonderful World of Korean Food: Snacks and Seasonings

Gimbap (<a href=unrulybadger/flickr)" src="http://asiasociety.org/files/imagecache/small/gimbap.jpg">
Food & Recipes Korean Seasonings

In the past, every Korean household would make soy sauce, doenjang soybean paste and gochujang red pepper paste. These three are the most important seasonings in the Korean diet, so preparing them well is another important annual task along with making kimchi.

Each Korean household would keep a series of large and small crocks or earthenware jars in their backyards to contain soy sauce, soybean paste, red pepper paste, salt and various types of kimchi.

The Wonderful World of Korean Food

Food & Recipes

About Korean Food

Pickles: Helping Preserve Memories of Home

Food & Recipes

Lucy Norris's book Pickled: Vegetables, Fruits, Roots, More--Preserving a World of Tastes and Traditions (Harry N. Abrams, 2003) presents a varied collection of more than 80 pickle recipes--all passed down through families for generations.

Sweet Rice Dumplings (Nom Plaiy Aiy)

(Photo by su-lin/Flickr)
Food & Recipes

Makes 25 to 30 dumplings.

Ingredients

8 1/2 cups water
1/4 pound palm sugar
1 1/2 cups glutinous rice flour, or more if necessary
2 teaspoons sesame seeds
Pinch of salt
1/2 cup freshly grated coconut or packaged unsweetened shredded coconut

Directions

Classic Noodle Soup (K'tieu)

Classic Noodle Soup (K'tieu)
Food & Recipes

Serves 4 to 6 generously.

Ingredients

Cambodian Grilled Chicken (Mouan Ang)

(Photo by ssour/Flickr)
Food & Recipes

Serves 4.

Ingredients

1/4 cup mushroom soy sauce
2 tablespoons sugar
4 garlic cloves, smashed and coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
8 chicken legs

Directions