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Worldwide Locations

Category: Policy

Davis Release Highlights Fragility of US-Pakistan Partnership

Pakistani police escort arrested US national Raymond Davis (C) to a court in Lahore on Jan. 28, 2011. (Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy The bilateral relationship should not be allowed to become hostage to similar incidents in future.

In Japan's Wake, Can Nuclear be Relied Upon to Fuel Asia's Boom?

Anti-nuclear activists hold a protest near the presidential palace in Manila on March 15, 2011. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society Global Council Co-Chair Simon Tay has penned an op-ed entitled "Japan gives Asia pause in its nuclear ambitions," published earlier this week in Singapore's Today newspaper and the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong.

Drone Attacks in Pakistan: Truth and Consequences

Activists of the Pakistani fundamentalist Islamic party Jamaat-i-Islami shout slogans calling for an en end to American drone attacks in tribal areas on January 23, 2011 during an anti-US protest rally in Peshawar. (A Majeed /AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

In an unprecedented move, a Pakistani general has proclaimed that most of the targets of US drone attacks in Pakistan’s Pushtun tribal belt are "hardcore militants" and the number of "innocent people being killed is relatively low."

This must be music to the ears of CIA officials who run this program. However, everyone else is surprised because this statement has come at a time when the Raymond Davis controversy has sullied the bilateral relationship.

Is Real Peace Possible for Sri Lanka?

L to R: Sri Lankan Ambassador Palitha T.B. Kohona, Asia Society’s Jamie Metzl, and Amb. Robert Blake of the US State Department in New York on Mar. 14, 2011.
Policy The panel came just after Ambassador Blake's public call for greater transparency and accountability with regard to potential war crimes committed in the latter stages of Sri Lanka's decades-long civil war.

Crisis a "Leadership Opportunity" for Japan

A man cycles past upturned cars and tsunami wrought devastation in Natori City, Miyagi prefecture on March 14, 2011. (Mike Clarke /AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Northeast Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami have already killed thousands and left a landscape in ruin, but the country's nightmare is far from over. Rescuers are struggling to find survivors and the Japanese government is grappling with unstable nuclear reactors.

"The Japanese government and its people are working together to deal with both the physical and emotional damage left in the wake,” says Michael Kulma, Asia Society's Executive Director for Global Leadership Initiatives.

Japan's Disaster: Assessing the Long-Term Effects

 A survivor wrapped in a blanket stands to look on tsunami-damaged town at Ishinomaki city in Miyagi prefecture on March 13, 2011. (Yomiuri Shimbun /AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The March 11 earthquake and tsunami, and the nuclear plant explosions that followed, are the biggest national emergency Japan has faced since World War II. As the scale of the damage emerges, how the Japanese government responds will determine more than the fate of hundreds of thousands of people in the areas affected. It will also shape the country's direction for many years to come.

Sri Lanka: Is A 'Culture of Impunity' Blocking Reconciliation?

Sri Lankan children climb aboard an armoured vehicle on display in Colombo on Dec. 15, 2010. (Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy Over the last week, the United States has raised its voice regarding accountability and reconciliation in post-war Sri Lanka.

Aussie PM Gillard Wows Washington with Football, Tears, History

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard addresses the US Congress in Washington on Mar. 9, 2011. Seated behind Gillard are US Senator Daniel Inouye (D-HI) (R), and President Pro Tempore, and Speaker of the House John Boehner. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy Nothing much new was expected to come from the first visit to Washington, DC by Australia's first female Prime Minister, Julia Gillard. And nothing new really did.

For the 21st Century: More Female Voices at the Table

Asia Society President Vishakha Desai
Policy

On March 8, 2011 over 100 countries celebrated International Women's Day, and throughout March, hundreds of events will not only mark the accomplishments of women but also raise awareness about women’s rights issues.

While celebrating and reflecting, Asia Society President Vishakha Desai says we must also "remind ourselves of the dramatically changed context of the world in the early decades of the 21st century and its implications for women."

Thailand, One Year Later: No Compromise in Sight?

Anti-government Thai demonstrators flee during a clash with soldiers near central Bangkok's Lumphini Park on May 13, 2010. (Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Policy March 12, 2011 marks the one-year anniversary of the start of Thailand's anti-government Red Shirt protests