Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Category: Business

Bill Rhodes, Banker to the World, on Our Contagious Global Economy

Bull knocking out the bear in Yu Gardens, Shanghai, on Feb. 5, 2008. (Augapfel/Flickr)
Business

Rhodes, former vice chair of Citigroup and Asia Society trustee, offers some thoughts prior to his March 1 appearance at Asia Society New York.

Video: APEC Leaders Reflect on 2011 Summit Successes

Former White House Coordinator for APEC Matthew Goodman (L) and Johnson & Johnson Chairman and CEO William Weldon (R) at Asia Society New York on January 18, 2011.
Business

Johnson & Johnson CEO William Weldon and other APEC leaders discuss the strengths of the 2011 summit and speculate on the future of the region.

2012: 5 Asia Finance Trends to Watch For

China will continue to take steps to ultimately make the yuan, pictured, a convertible currency. (Flickr/David Dennis)
Business

Credit is tightening, economic growth is moderating, and property prices are finally falling, yet Asia remains one of the few true growth regions of the world, writes Sheridan Prasso.

Survey: Hong Kong Slightly Cheaper, But Still One of Asia's 10 Most Expensive Cities

Hong Kong harbor. (Roger Wagner/Flickr)
Business

Beijing, Shanghai and Singapore have overtaken Hong Kong among the 10 most expensive places in Asia, according to a survey just published by ECA International for the year 2011.

Reshaping Capitalism and Saving the Planet with Chandran Nair

Chandran Nair, author of <i>Consumptionomics</i>.
Business

On two occasions this week Asia Society will be hosting Chandran Nair, Founder and CEO of the Global Institute for Tomorrow (GIFT), for an author talk in which he shares his ideas about constraining consumption.

Orville Schell on Walmart and the Greening of China

Walmart in Shenzhen, China. (dcmaster/Flickr)
Business

Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director of the U.S.-China Center at Asia Society, has an article in The Atlantic discussing how a burgeoning "green movement" has affected Walmart's relationship with China. Are the world's most populous country and the world's largest corporation at the vanguard of a growing environmental movement? Schell isn't so sure:

Arvind Subramanian: Chinese Currency and American 'Conceit'

A bank clerk counts a stack of U.S and Chinese bills at a bank in Huaibei, in eastern China's Anhui province, on May 20, 2010. (AFP/AFP/Getty Images)
Business

A new President of the United States is on his way to meet the Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund, who is a Chinese national, to ask him for money to salvage the American economony — possibly on the verge of collapse.

Aerotropolis: A Flight Plan for Asia's Urban Future

A jetliner takes off over the Beijing Capital International airport in Beijing. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Business

The sleek, modern airports that have popped up all over East Asia have become the envy of the world, causing even President Obama to mention them in his 2011 State of the Union speech. In their new book Aerotropolis: The Way We'll Live Next, Greg Lindsay and John D. Kasarda argue that these airports are not only impressive for aesthetic and functional reasons, but also because they represent a glimpse into how our future cities will be organized.

Metzl: U.S. Currency Bill Addresses 'Massively Undervalued' Yuan

Business

“We are harming you. But if you defend yourself, you're going to start a fight,” said Asia Society Executive Vice President Jamie Metzl, referring to the proposal by the U.S. Senate aimed at punishing China for keeping the yuan undervalued. In an interview hosted by Matt Miller on the Bloomberg television program Fast Forward, Metzl debated the China currency bill with Dan Ikenson, associate director for trade policy at the Cato Institute.

Orville Schell Discusses US-China Trade on Bloomberg

Orville Schell
Business

Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director of the Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations, appeared on Bloomberg's Taking Stock podcast Thursday to discuss the effects of Sino-American trade. While the relocation of so many manufacturing jobs to China has fundamentally altered the structure of the U.S. economy, Schell believes blaming China for America's current economic malaise misrepresents the true situation.