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When the 'Asian Way' Can Be the Wrong Way

Mongolian President President Tsakhia Elbegdorj at Asia Society New York on Sept. 19, 2011. (Suzanna Finley/Asia Society)
Policy

Originally published in the Bangkok Post, Oct. 11, 2011

East Asian countries are well-known for nationalist policies that coalesce around single ethnicities, or in the case of Singapore, recognition of diversity, but careful management of diversity in the name of a higher national calling.

Yangzom Brauen: 'Across Many Mountains' to Speak for Tibet

Yangzom Brauen, author of <i>Across Many Mountains</i>.
Policy

Yangzom Brauen's new family memoir Across Many Mountains tells the harrowing yet ultimately inspirational story of her grandmother and mother's life in Tibet and their subsequent escape and exile after the Tibetan independence movement was suppressed by Chairman Mao's Red Army.

Asia Mourns Steve Jobs, 1955-2011

This tribute to the late Steve Jobs by 19-year-old Hong Kong design student Jonathan Mak became an Internet hit on Thursday, Oct. 6, 2011 as word of the Apple co-founder's death reached around the world.
Lifestyle

News of Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs's death spread quickly through South and East Asia Thursday morning, prompting people across the continent to express their mourning in a variety of ways. 

Does a New Biography Tell the Whole Story on Deng Xiaoping?

Deng Xiaoping (1904-1997).
Policy

Deng Xiaoping once appraised the rule of his predecessor as China's paramount leader, Mao Zedong, as being "70 percent positive and 30 percent negative". How would Deng's own performance in office be assessed?  A new biography by the Harvard professor Ezra Vogel attempts to answer this question, through using (fortunately) more sophisticated tools than mere mathematical formulae.

Interview: Sean Gallagher on Documenting China's Wetland Crisis

Dujiangyan, Sichuan province, China. (Sean Gallagher)
Multimedia

Beijing-based videographer and photographer Sean Gallagher produced a series of documentary videos about China's wetlands crisis for Asia Society's ongoing China Green project. The Pulitzer Center grant winner's work is embedded below. Gallagher spoke to us via email.

Why 'The Onion' Prank Isn't Funny

Education

The tweetosphere was a-flutter late last week when the satirical news organization The Onion claimed children were being held hostage by a “group of armed Congressmen.” The Washington Post urged its readers to lighten up. The Capitol Police issued a statement that they can take a joke, but insisted, “this is not a very good joke.”

One reason it's not funny is because people realize it's metaphorically true.

Orville Schell Discusses US-China Trade on Bloomberg

Orville Schell
Business

Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director of the Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations, appeared on Bloomberg's Taking Stock podcast Thursday to discuss the effects of Sino-American trade. While the relocation of so many manufacturing jobs to China has fundamentally altered the structure of the U.S. economy, Schell believes blaming China for America's current economic malaise misrepresents the true situation.

'Coal + Ice' Exhibition Opens in Beijing

Yang Junpo, <i>Pingdingshan, Henan Province, China</i>, 1996.
Sustainability

Today's New York Times devotes extensive coverage to Coal + Ice, a new photography exhibition that opened last weekend at the Three Shadows gallery in Beijing.

Asia Society Documentary Series 'Visions of a New China' Garners Media Acclaim

Still from <i>Floating</i> (Huang Weikai, 2005), screening Oct. 21 at Asia Society New York.
Arts

Launched this past Sunday, Asia Society New York's nine-film, month-long documentary series Visions of a New China is enjoying the attention of both the mainstream and more specialized cinephile press. The New York Times featured it in the Sunday, Sept. 25 Arts & Leisure section, where "Week Ahead" columnist Neil Genzlinger wrote:

Interview: Patrick French, Author of 'India: A Portrait'

Arts

Winston Churchill's famous quotation about Russia — that it is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma — could just as easily be applied to contemporary India. At times both ancient and modern, cramped and sprawling, and destitute and prosperous, the country today is undoubtedly  poised to assume a greater role on the world stage. Yet how well do we really know India?