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Keyword: china

2012: Coming Year's Leadership Transitions Could Have Major Asia Impact

 Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping (R), the presumptive heir to current President Hu Jintao, speaks with former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen  in Beijing on July 11, 2011. Xi is just one of several new world leaders who could have a major impact on Asia in 2012 and beyond. Photo by Chad J. McNeeley. (Flickr/Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff)
Policy

It seems only fitting that at the end of 2011, a year of such tremendous political change around the world, we should all be fixated with intense curiosity on the machinations of a leadership transition in North Korea.

There are many reasons for the events that unfolded into the Arab Spring, but at the root is a failure in leadership. While the Arab Spring did not result in similar uprisings in Asia, the events were followed with tremendous interest throughout the region.

2011: Cooling Temperatures in the South China Sea

A U.S. Coast Guard seaman stands lookout watch in the South China Sea as two Republic of Singapore ships pass by U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mellon during an exercise as part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) on July 14, 2010. (CARAT/Flickr)
Policy

After another year of noise and smoke in 2011, temperatures on the issue of South China Sea have cooled down considerably, writes Fudan University's Shen Dingli.

2011: On the U.S. Campaign Trail, a Deficit of Diplomacy

Former Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain made headlines for the wrong reasons with his
Policy

The U.S. presidential campaign heated up in 2011, as Americans ready themselves to vote in November 2012. While the current fiscal environment demands candidates focus on domestic economic challenges and solutions, in our interdependent world, foreign policy has to take a top spot on the list of presidential priorities. Unfortunately, election season is rife with fire and brimstone foreign policy rhetoric, attempting to engage voters at the detriment of diplomacy.

2011: Year-End Reflections on America's Strategic 'Pivot'

L to R: IMF Chief Christine Lagarde and U.S. President Barack Obama talk with China President Hu Jintao at the opening session of the 2011 APEC Summit at the Marriott Hotel in Honolulu on Nov. 13, 2011. (International Monetary Fund/Flickr)
Policy

This post is part of a series of year-end posts on Asia Blog written by Asia Society experts and Associate Fellows looking back on noteworthy events in 2011. You can read the entire series here.

Exactly 100 years ago, on December 12, 1911, the British empire firmly established its new capital in Delhi with full pageantry and began the grand project of building a new city that would appropriately project its global standing.

2011: Will Japan's Leaders Squander Post-Disaster Goodwill?

John Dicola (R) of the U.S. Navy assists in removing debris during a cleanup effort at the Misawa Fishing Port in Japan on March 14, 2011. Photo by Devon Dow. (Flickr/U.S. Pacific Fleet)
Policy

The world may admire Japan's resolve, but unless the country's leaders get their act together "it’s hard to see a bright future," writes Ayako Doi.

2011: Five Big China Stories (That Didn't Happen in China)

What do riots in London mean to leaders in Beijing? (Flickr/rorymizen)
Policy

It is crucial not to overlook things that happen elsewhere that change the state of play within Chinese political life, writes Jeffrey Wasserstrom.

2012: The Year Mandarin Chinese Becomes a 'Commonly Taught Language'?

A student at Aiton Elementary School in Washington, D.C., practices Chinese. (Grace Norman)
Education

U.S. schools are beginning to see the value in teaching the world's most commonly spoken language. And hopefully the reasons are not just economic, writes Chris Livaccari.

Jae-Seung Lee: The Moment of Truth for the Two Koreas

(Flickr/mag3737)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's death has created a critical opportunity for the two Koreas to figure out a roadmap for the coming years, writes Korea University's Jae-Seung Lee.

Vishakha Desai: Will Asia Be One?

Statue of Indian poet, playwright, musician, and artist Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) at Tagore House in Kolkata. (kittell/Flickr)
Policy

A century after leading intellectuals first articulated a notion of Asian identity, writes Asia Society's President, it has the potential to become true.

2011: Google Zeitgeist, How Asia Searched the World

Lifestyle

The internet giant released its annual survey of popular global search terms. Find out what people and events ranked highest in China, India, Japan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and more.