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Food in Chinese Culture




For the preparation of cai, or dishes, the use of multiple ingredients and the mixing of flavors are the rules, which above all means that ingredients are usually cut up and not done whole, and that they are variously combined into individual dishes of vastly differing flavors. Pork for example, may be diced, slice shredded, or ground, and when combined with other meats and with various vegetable ingredients and spice produces dishes of utterly diverge, shapes, flavors, colors, tastes, and aromas.

The parallelism of fan and cai and the above-described principles of cai preparation account for a number (other features of the Chinese food culture, especially in the area of utensil To begin with, there are fan utensils and ts'ai utensils, both for cooking an for serving. In the modem kitchen, fan guo ("rice cooker") and cai kuo ("wok") are very different and as a rule not interchangeable utensils. . . . To prepare the kind of ts'ai that we have characterized, the chopping knife or cleaver and the chopping anvil are standard equipment in every Chinese kitchen, ancient and modern. To sweep the cooked grains into the mouth, and to serve the cut-up morsel of the meat-and vegetable dishes chopsticks have proved more service able than hands or other instruments (such as spoons and forks, the former being used in China alongside the chopsticks).

This complex of interrelated features of Chinese food may be described, for the purpose of shorthand reference, as the Chinese fan-ts'ai principle. Send a Chinese cook into an American kitchen, given Chinese or American ingredients, and he or she will (a) prepare an adequate amount of fan, (b) cut up the ingredients and mix them up in various combinations, and (c) cook the ingredients into several dishes and, perhaps, a soup. Given the right ingredients, the "Chineseness" of the meal would increase, but even with entirely native American ingredients and cooked in American utensils, it is still a Chinese meal.

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they eat dog?!
Thank You Mr Chang, your essay was quite helpfull!
not that some cultures don't eat bugs as part of their cuisine.... i was simply trying to phrase it so that the most common people who have access to the internet would understand. BTW fried bugs are actually a delicacy, however much it sounds disgusting!
sorry for the double.... triple post :P
I agree with Kat, though in a sense, shouldn't that mean that we all should eat bugs? as they are the most common? the thought makes me shudder. though in truth, if i was asked whether i would starve or eat something truly disgusting, i would chose the latter. I would rather be alive and sick, than STARVING and sick.
I think this article is incredibly informative. I feel that dwelling on our own likes or dislikes about one ingredient mentioned one time does ourselves and the author a great disservice.
I'm indian but I would love to go to China and eat authentic Chinese food coz you know what you're getting is the real thing. I think the writer is right, few other cultures are as food oriented as the Chinese. They are so hospitable........
I need some information about production of new food and the chart of production of this and nutrient effect of this . can you help me ? can you give me a perfect information about this? if you can pleas send to my email .thanks
To me eating dog would be a crazy idea. But on the other hand I have to respect the cultural differences. What might seem normal to me, might be considered crazy by someone of another cultural background.
in my opinion when an economy such as china has a surplus population as it does and does not have enough resources such as beef as we do in the U.S. they must rely on what they have. if dog is all they have then they must eat it. Would you think differently of France because they eat Horse meat? Or mexico because they eat cats?