anGie seah

b. 1979 in Singapore
Working in Singapore
Showing at Asia Society Museum
On view from March 16, 2021, through June 27, 2021
Angie Seah From Shadow to Shama

anGie seah, From Shadow to Shaman, 2015. Instructions, clay hammers, spotlight, and public participation. Dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. Photograph courtesy of the artist

anGie seah, From Shadow to Shaman, 2015

anGie seah, From Shadow to Shaman, 2015. Instructions, clay hammers, spotlight, and public participation. Dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. Photograph by Anne Simonnot

anGie seah, From Shadow to Shaman, 2015

anGie seah, From Shadow to Shaman, 2015. Instructions, clay hammers, spotlight, and public participation. Dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. Photograph courtesy of the artist

anGie seah, From Shadow to Shaman, 2015

anGie seah, From Shadow to Shaman, 2015. Instructions, clay hammers, spotlight, and public participation. Dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. Photograph courtesy of the artist

anGie seah’s work encompasses drawing, sculpture, and sound-based performance. Her fascination with mysticism and sacred music has led her to investigate the ways that ritual and mystery permeate everyday life. A key artistic strategy in her work is a reliance on spontaneity, allowing chance and intuition to function as tools to navigate one through shifting emotional resonances and psychological states. For more than a decade, seah has been creating participatory art projects with communities locally and internationally.

From Shadow to Shaman is made up of three elements: a participatory installation, a solo performance, and a collective performance. The installation, centered on hundreds of low-fired clay hammers, is accompanied by a single-channel video and an instruction guide that encourages the visitor to enact a sequence of physical and vocal actions meant to provide a cathartic release. These autonomous actions are wake-up calls for reinventing mundane objects into tools to express our lives in the moment. A sequence of vocal cries and shouts epitomizes the artist’s belief in the ability of one’s voice to bring forth something from deep within one’s body. 

Supported by Lauren Bogen and Richard Nijkerk, and Vinod and Adele Nair.