NYT's David Barboza on Reporting in China

Asia Blog Interview

David Barboza (R) receives an award from Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger at the annual Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism, Letters, Drama, and Music Winners Luncheon at Columbia University on May 30, 2013 in New York City. (Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images)
David Barboza (R) receives an award from Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger at the annual Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism, Letters, Drama, and Music Winners Luncheon at Columbia University on May 30, 2013 in New York City. (Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images)

In 2012, the New York Times published a groundbreaking investigative report showing that the family of Wen Jiabao, China's then-prime minister, possessed wealth in excess of $2.7 billion. In response, the Chinese government blocked the Times' website in China and refused to grant the paper any new journalist visas for the following three years.

The article earned accolades for its author, David Barboza, who served as the paper's Shanghai correspondent from 2004 to 2015. In 2013 he was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for the report's "striking exposure of corruption at high levels of the Chinese government, including billions in secret wealth owned by relatives of the prime minister, well documented work published in the face of heavy pressure from the Chinese officials." In addition, that same year he was part of a team that won the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting for a series of reports examining challenges posed by increasingly globalized high-tech industries. He has also reported on the fall and execution of China's top food and drug regulator and authored a series of articles examining the impact of China's pollution crisis.

Earlier this January 2016, Barboza talked with Asia Blog about the aftermath of his report on Wen Jiabao, why he keeps a low profile on social media, and where his views on the role of a reporter part ways with some of his colleagues. Click here to read the full interview with Asia Society's Eric Fish.


On March 2 at ASNC, David Barboza will join Clayton Dube of USC's U.S.-China Institute for a discussion on "China's Red Nobility." REGISTER NOW!