Jordan Nassar

b. 1985 in New York, NY, United States of America
Working in New York, NY, United States of America
Showing at Asia Society Museum
On view October 27, 2020, through February 7, 2021
Jordan Nassar, I Am Waiting For You, 2018

Jordan Nassar, I Am Waiting For You, 2018. Hand embroidered cotton on cotton. H. 34 x W. 36 in. (86.4 x 91.4 cm). Collection of Giora Kaplan. Image courtesy the artist, Anat Ebgi, and James Cohan, New York

Location: Asia Society Museum
Jordan Nassar, Memories, 2018

Jordan Nassar, Memories, 2018. Hand embroidered cotton on cotton. H. 33 1/2 x W. 36 in. (85.1 x 91.4 cm). Collection of Giora Kaplan. Image courtesy the artist, Anat Ebgi, and James Cohan, New York

Location: Asia Society Museum
This Is My Night by  Jordan Nassar

Jordan Nassar, This Is My Night, 2018. Hand-embroidered cotton on cotton. H. 35 x W. 36 in. (88.9 x 91.4 cm). Courtesy of James Cohan, New York. Image courtesy the artist, Anat Ebgi, and James Cohan, New York

Jordan Nassar’s meticulously crafted embroidered works depict imaginary landscapes that fuse craft with concept. Growing up within the Palestinian diaspora inspired the artist’s engagement with traditional Palestinian decorative motifs. He uses these to address the sociopolitical histories and hierarchies that dictate the existence of Palestinians living in the West Bank and the imaginations of those who have left. These works are often realized with assistance from hired female artisans from the West Bank. This partnership allows the women to build entrepreneurial businesses that provide an economic agency atypical within the region while also connecting them to global networks. The artist received a BA from Middlebury College in 2007. 


The two embroideries included in the Triennial are examples of Nassar’s collaborative works created with female Palestinian artisans from the West Bank. The artist provides conceptual direction to the women, but they select the color and pattern of the embroidery to fill all but a predesignated blank rectangle area of the canvas. Their handiwork often reflects regional and personal histories and provides the women with a viable livelihood. Nassar finishes the work by adding his own embroidered pattern into the remaining blank space. This intervention, often resembling a window looking out onto an imaginary landscape, fancifully disrupts the rigid geometric grid dictated by the traditional patterns. The final composition is a physical and intellectual dialogue across cultures and genders that deftly subverts conventional hierarchies. 

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