What is Global Competence?

The idea of global competence articulates the knowledge and skills students need in the 21st century.

Globally competent students have the knowledge and skills to:

Investigate the World

Globally competent students are aware, curious, and interested in learning about the world and how it works.

Recognize Perspectives

Globally competent students recognize that they have a particular perspective, and that others may or may not share it.

Communicate Ideas

Globally competent students can effectively communicate, verbally and non-verbally, with diverse audiences.

Take Action

Globally competent students have the skills and knowledge to not just learn about the world, but also to make a difference in the world.

The Four Domains of Global Competence

The Four Domains of Global Competence [image and description]

Learn More About Teaching for Global Competence

Learn about online global competence courses and certificate programs offered by the Center for Global Education in collaboration with Arizona State University designed for educators in schools and in out-of-school time.
resource
Download globally focused performance outcomes and rubrics in a variety of grades and all academic subjects, plus a free copy of the book here.
Read the book that introduced the definition of global competence, Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth to Engage the World.

Read More About Global Competence

Career and Technical Education (CTE) is a promising way to prepare U.S. students for the increasing number of careers requiring global competency, according to a new report by Asia Society.
Dr. Tony Jackson highlights need to develop students’ 21st century skills and global competence in keynote to the 18th annual OECD Japan Seminar in Tokyo.
Educating for Citizenship in a Global World
Heidi Steele reflects on sessions she attended at the 2015 National Chinese Language Conference (NCLC) in the partnerships and community engagement strand.
report
A Rosetta Stone for Noncognitive Skills describes the Big Five factors that can be used by educators to develop noncognitive skills.
Students compare different communication methods in this short lesson on efficiency in communication.
Education activist and "favorite" guest of Oprah Winfrey Dr. Tererai Trent talks to Asia Society ahead of her keynote at the Partnership for Global Learning Conference on June 27, 2014.
Q&A with Teach For All's Wendy Kopp
Students create their own language in this lesson as a way to understand how languages are constructed.

Connect With Us

Asia Society
725 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10021
t: 212-327-9260
education@asiasociety.org

Follow Our Blog on Education Week

Newsletter