What is Global Competence?

The idea of global competence articulates the knowledge and skills students need in the 21st century.

Globally competent students have the knowledge and skills to:

Investigate the World

Globally competent students are aware, curious, and interested in learning about the world and how it works.

Recognize Perspectives

Globally competent students recognize that they have a particular perspective, and that others may or may not share it.

Communicate Ideas

Globally competent students can effectively communicate, verbally and non-verbally, with diverse audiences.

Take Action

Globally competent students have the skills and knowledge to not just learn about the world, but also to make a difference in the world.

The Four Domains of Global Competence

The Four Domains of Global Competence [image and description]

Learn More About Teaching for Global Competence

Learn about online global competence courses and certificate programs offered by the Center for Global Education in collaboration with Arizona State University designed for educators in schools and in out-of-school time.
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Download globally focused performance outcomes and rubrics in a variety of grades and all academic subjects, plus a free copy of the book here.
Read the book that introduced the definition of global competence, Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth to Engage the World.

Read More About Global Competence

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Asia Society’s Apoorvaa Joshi digs through the flood of information about the 2016 presidential election and provides ideas and strategies for using the election to build students’ global competence.
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Asia Society Vice President of Education Tony Jackson reflects on his own experiences with global competence and describes how teaching through a global lens can help address the equity issues we face in education.
"Language is a currency for trust, and respect; it provides bricks and mortar for building an ability to explore the beauty of diverse cultures, traditions, and historical perspectives."
Heather Clydesdale on how the pedagogical approaches that world language teachers have been using for years bear striking similarities to the Common Core.
Children and adolescents need a broad range of experiences to build their knowledge of the world and understand their place in it. Learn how to use expanded learning time to build global competence.
Learning a second language is about more than getting ahead — it teaches a whole new way of thinking.
"Non-cognitive" skills such as critical thinking and creativity are just as vital as traditional skills in helping 21st century students.
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U.S. educators face a critical imperative: prepare all students for work and civic roles with the ability to compete, connect, and cooperate on an international scale. One promising way to do this is through Career and Technical Education.
Career and Technical Education (CTE) is a promising way to prepare U.S. students for the increasing number of careers requiring global competency, according to a new report by Asia Society.

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