Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Keyword: asean

Andrew Billo: 'Forward-Looking Approach' Needed in South China Sea Dispute

The USS Vandegrift cruises the South China Sea on Oct. 15, 2012. (U.S. Navy/Flickr)
Policy

Real progress toward resolving one of Asia's most pressing territorial disputes will only come by addressing a host of factors at once, writes the organizer of Asia Society's recent South China Sea conference.

Territorial Disputes Put ASEAN Between Dialogue and the Deep Blue Sea

A Vietnamese fishing boat sails next to the U.S. 7th Fleet's flagship USS Blue Ridge entering Tien Sa port on April 23, 2012. (Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

As Asia rises, it faces a dilemma: whether to abide by Western diplomatic norms, or to respect Asian values, such as consensus, harmony, and good neighborliness.

Interview: Kishore Mahbubani Says Stable US-China Relations Will Be 2013's Big Story

Kishore Mahbubani at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland on January 27, 2012. (World Economic Forum/Flickr)
Policy

Singapore's veteran diplomat and analyst predicts that stable relations between the United States and China will in fact be the big story in 2013. In-person appearance at Asia Society New York on February 6, 2013.

Chinese Investment Ensures Human Rights Remain Low Priority in Cambodia

Then-President of China Hu Jintao (L) is welcomed by Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen (R) in Phnom Penh on March 31, 2012. Hu arrived in the Cambodian capital on a state visit to bolster ties between the already-close nations. (Pring Samrang/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Human rights in Cambodia are in a dire state, and China holds a lion's share of the blame, argues Pulitzer Prize-winner Joel Brinkley.

Obama Takes a Crucial Step Toward Southeast Asia

L to R: U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia Scot Marciel, Ambassador David Carden, U.S. Mission to ASEAN, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and U.S. President Barack Obama at the ASEAN Summit in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia, on Nov. 18, 2011. (Flickr/The White House)
Policy

President Barack Obama's visit to Southeast Asia, representing the first time a sitting American president has visited either Cambodia or Myanmar, is unprecedented in its timing and chosen itinerary.

We Asked Our Experts: What Does Obama's Re-Election Mean for Asia?

U.S. President Barack Obama arrives on stage after winning the 2012 U.S. presidential election in Chicago, Illinois on November 7, 2012. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

How is a second term for the Obama administration likely to affect relations with China, Myanmar, Pakistan, and Afghanistan — to name just some of the Asian nations that have featured most prominently in recent headlines? Click to read commentary from Asia Society experts.

Hurricane Sandy: Could Extreme Weather Spur Reform in US as it Did in Myanmar?

Aerial views of the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy to the New Jersey coast taken during a search and rescue mission by 1-150 Assault Helicopter Battalion, New Jersey Army National Guard, October 30, 2012. (DVIDSHUB/Flickr)
Policy

In 2008 Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar, causing massive devastation but spurring reform. Can Sandy push America to tackle climate change?

Op-Ed: Could Conflict in the South China Sea Lead to a 'New Cold War'?

U.S. aircraft carriers in the South China Sea on July 8, 2012. (U.S. Navy/Declan Barnes/Flickr)
Policy

A strong and united ASEAN is key to avoiding a standoff between China and the United States in the South China Sea, writes Nguyen Manh Hung.

Interview: 'Political Stability at Home' Key to South China Sea Peace

A Philippine soldier stands guard next to fishing boats at a pier in Masinloc town, Zambales province, 140 miles from Scarborough Shoal on May 18, 2012. Philippine President Benigno Aquino told protesters to abort plans to sail May 18, to the disputed South China Sea shoal also claimed by China. (Ted Aljibe/AFP/GettyImages)
Policy

Huang Jing, Director of the Center on Asia and Globalization at the Singapore-based Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, discusses the current tensions in the South China Sea.

Interview: Ian Bremmer and the New 'Regional World Order'

Ian Bremmer, President of Eurasia Group, at the Annual Meeting 2011 of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, January 30, 2011. (World Economic Forum/Flickr)
Policy

"There are pressing international issues, but all of the world’s major powers, established and emerging, have domestic priorities that take precedence," says political scientist Ian Bremmer, who appears at Asia Society New York on May 24.