Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Asia Blog

Vishakha Desai: Female Politicians in Asia Making it on Merit

Yingluck Sinawatra may be following in the footsteps of her brother, Thailand's former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, but had her own career as a successful businesswoman before she became the country's first female prime minister. (Flickr/Ratchaprasong 2)
Policy

Asia Society President Vishakha Desai says that there's something different about the quality of female politicians in Asia today.

2011: Will Japan's Leaders Squander Post-Disaster Goodwill?

John Dicola (R) of the U.S. Navy assists in removing debris during a cleanup effort at the Misawa Fishing Port in Japan on March 14, 2011. Photo by Devon Dow. (Flickr/U.S. Pacific Fleet)
Policy

The world may admire Japan's resolve, but unless the country's leaders get their act together "it’s hard to see a bright future," writes Ayako Doi.

2011: Five Big China Stories (That Didn't Happen in China)

What do riots in London mean to leaders in Beijing? (Flickr/rorymizen)
Policy

It is crucial not to overlook things that happen elsewhere that change the state of play within Chinese political life, writes Jeffrey Wasserstrom.

Hassan Abbas: 'How Obama Can Fix U.S.-Pakistani Relations'

Local Pakistani kids await to be evacuated on a CH-60 Blackhawk in Khyber - Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, on Sept. 13, 2010. Photo By Joshua Kruger. (Flickr/DVIDSHUB)
Policy

As Pakistan struggles with its democratic transition, Asia Society Senior Advisor Hassan Abbas writes in Foreign Affairs that Obama can help Pakistan help itself by taking a less unilateral approach and focusing instead on strengthening Pakistan's civilian government and investing in civil society. Abbas points out: 

2012: The Year Mandarin Chinese Becomes a 'Commonly Taught Language'?

A student at Aiton Elementary School in Washington, D.C., practices Chinese. (Grace Norman)
Education

U.S. schools are beginning to see the value in teaching the world's most commonly spoken language. And hopefully the reasons are not just economic, writes Chris Livaccari.

Jae-Seung Lee: The Moment of Truth for the Two Koreas

(Flickr/mag3737)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's death has created a critical opportunity for the two Koreas to figure out a roadmap for the coming years, writes Korea University's Jae-Seung Lee.

Vishakha Desai: Will Asia Be One?

Statue of Indian poet, playwright, musician, and artist Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) at Tagore House in Kolkata. (kittell/Flickr)
Policy

A century after leading intellectuals first articulated a notion of Asian identity, writes Asia Society's President, it has the potential to become true.

2011: Google Zeitgeist, How Asia Searched the World

Lifestyle

The internet giant released its annual survey of popular global search terms. Find out what people and events ranked highest in China, India, Japan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and more.

Photo of the Day: Philippines Flood

Multimedia

Two boys look at a destroyed house in Iligan City, in southern island of Mindanao, Philippines on December 19, 2011. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

Lee: With Kim Jong Il Dead, a Chance to Normalize Inter-Korean Relations

Kim Il Sung (L) and Kim Jong Il are pictured in this piece of propaganda art photographed in North Korea. (Flickr/yeowatzup)
Policy

Kim Jong Il is dead. While it is never clear whether history creates a leader, or a leader creates history, one thing is clear: The more a leader dominates power over a nation, the more its regime's fate will be changed by that leader’s death. So where is North Korea headed after Kim Jong Il’s death?