Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Remembering 9/11

Remembering 9/11
(Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images)
 

The terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001 transformed world affairs and irrevocably altered America's relationship with at least two Asian nations — Afghanistan and Pakistan. Since then, Asia Society has used its unique position as a bridge between Asia and the United States to present a wide array of programming, opinion and analysis related to 9/11 and its fallout. The content listed below (in reverse chronological order) presents a worldwide spectrum of responses to the attacks and their aftermath.

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NEW YORK, May 18, 2011 - Hassan Abbas, Najam Sethi, Shirin Tahir-Kheli, and Frank Wisner discuss the Pakistan 2020 report with Suzanne DiMaggio.
Hassan Abbas, Asia Society's Bernard Schwartz Fellow, writes for CNN.com
Asia Society’s Pakistan 2020 Study Group provides recommendations to address Pakistan's political, social, and economic challenges over the coming decade.
Islamabad-based Asia Society Associate Fellow Faiysal AliKhan discusses how Pakistan's youth have reacted to Osama bin Laden's death and the diplomatic fallout that followed.
Former Indian Foreign Secretary Shyam Saran discusses U.S.-Pakistan relations and India's role in the region.
Video: Peter Bergen discusses meeting bin Laden, Al Qaeda and the Middle East protests, Pakistan's role, and the future of Afghanistan at Asia Society.
Arab Spring and Osama bin Laden's death threaten Al Qaeda, says veteran journalist and CNN analyst.
An Asia Society Fellow in Islamabad describes reactions on the ground in Pakistan to Osama bin Laden's death.
The CNN analyst is appearing at Asia Society in New York on Thursday, May 5, 2011.
But Asia Society Bernard Schwartz Fellow Hassan Abbas warns "the battle against violence and extremism is by no means over."