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Afghanistan


Experts discuss the prospects for achieving a strategic U.S. approach to South Asia and the hard choices an incoming Administration will need to make to get there.
With the end of the Afghanistan conflict, the Obama administration has a window of opportunity not seen since the end of the Cold War to refocus its strategy in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and the other countries of South Asia.
After decades of neglect (and worse), a Kabul home for Afghanistan's cultural heritage has a new lease on life.
Asia Society presents an address by Her Excellency Hina Rabbani Khar, Foreign Minister of Pakistan.
"Unlike the early 1990s, the United States should not and will not leave Afghanistan to its neighbors alone," writes Alexander Evans, who calls for a long-term, regional strategy for the embattled country.
In a new Asia Society report, Bernard Schwartz Fellow Alexander Evans outlines the steps Washington can take to forge a more strategic, cohesive, and successful policy toward South Asia.
Western analysts are premature in forecasting worst-case scenarios, argues Hassan Abbas.
In conjunction with Asia Society's latest report, join us for a discussion on prospects for achieving a strategic U.S. approach to South Asia.
This report offers new ideas on how to integrate competing U.S. interests in South Asia, encourage stronger interagency collaboration across the East Asia-South Asia divide, and expand expertise on South Asia in the U.S. government.
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