Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Can Asia's Growth Be Environmentally Sustainable?

"Environment in Asia" Series

CHIFENG, MONGOLIA - Smoke billows from chimneys at the Chifeng Thermal Power Plant on February 23, 2007 in Chifeng, Mongolia. (China Photos/Getty Images)

CHIFENG, MONGOLIA - Smoke billows from chimneys at the Chifeng Thermal Power Plant on February 23, 2007 in Chifeng, Mongolia. (China Photos/Getty Images)

"Environment in Asia" Series
NEW YORK, June 11, 2007 - Home to 60 percent of the world's population and most of the world's fastest growing economies, pollution control in Asia is one of the world's top priorities. China alone is set to become the largest emitter of greenhouse gas emissions within a decade. Japan is a model for green growth in the region.

In this Asia Society panel discussion, participants discussed how deforestation is actually a greater contributor than pollution to increases in CO2 and how it is more important for developed nations to become greener rather than developing ones. James Fahn, Executive Director of Internews' Earth Journalism Network, highlights how his network is proving to be a one-of-a-kind influence on environmental activism and the enforcement of regulations throughout the world. He also stresses how the poor are most affected by the environment. Nigel Sizer, Vice President of Rare Conservation's Asia-Pacific division and Jon Anda, President of the Environmental Markets Network, discusses failed and even counterproductive nature reservations and also reiterates the importance of small, local communities and their environmental cooperation and activism. All of the participants noted the challenges of policing the pollution of the world's largest and most powerful nations. One of these challenges pointed out throughout the discussion are the dynamics and supreme importance of public opinion toward the environment and the role the market must play in research and in deliberately increasing prices for environment-unfriendly sources. Orville Schell, the Arthur Ross Director of the Asia Society's Center on US-China Relations moderates this discussion.