Why One Loves to Hate Globalization

Why One Loves to Hate Globalization

Nayan Chanda, author of Bound Together.

A Luncheon Presentation by NAYAN CHANDA, Director of Publications, Yale University and Author

The word "globalization" evokes a visceral reaction like no other. It is accused of increasing global poverty and inequality, and hastening ecological catastrophe through unbridled exploitation of natural resources. However, while concerns are justified, they are not the result of some policy called 'globalization,' but the consequences of an accelerated process of interconnectedness. Growing connections between societies has always brought benefits as well as difficulties.

Today the problems emerge at unprecedented speed and are more visible, leading one to blame the process rather than the driving force behind it. What are the economic and technological forces of globalization? How did the history of science, politics, commerce and religion create today's international system? What is the past and what lies in store for globalization? How can people thrive in an interconnected world?

Nayan Chanda is the Director of Publications and the Editor of YaleGlobal Online Magazine at the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization. He was previously with the Far Eastern Economic Review for almost 30 years as editor-at-large, editor, and correspondent. He is the author and co-author of a dozen books, most recently Bound Together: How Traders, Preachers, Adventurers and Warriors Shaped Globalization, which has been translated into seven languages. He is the 2005 recipient of the Shorenstein Award for journalism presented jointly by Stanford and Harvard Universities. He graduated from Presidency College, Kolkata, received his post-graduate degree from Jadavpur University and studied international relations at the Sorbonne.

Book sale after program.

Event Details

13 August 2010
8:15am - 10:00am

JW Marriott Hotel, Level 3, Pacific Place, Admiralty Hong Kong

HK$390 Asia Society members/full-time students; HK$490 non-members