Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Asia Blog

2012: The Year Mandarin Chinese Becomes a 'Commonly Taught Language'?

A student at Aiton Elementary School in Washington, D.C., practices Chinese. (Grace Norman)
Education

U.S. schools are beginning to see the value in teaching the world's most commonly spoken language. And hopefully the reasons are not just economic, writes Chris Livaccari.

Jae-Seung Lee: The Moment of Truth for the Two Koreas

(Flickr/mag3737)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's death has created a critical opportunity for the two Koreas to figure out a roadmap for the coming years, writes Korea University's Jae-Seung Lee.

Vishakha Desai: Will Asia Be One?

Statue of Indian poet, playwright, musician, and artist Rabindranath Tagore (1861–1941) at Tagore House in Kolkata. (kittell/Flickr)
Policy

A century after leading intellectuals first articulated a notion of Asian identity, writes Asia Society's President, it has the potential to become true.

2011: Google Zeitgeist, How Asia Searched the World

Lifestyle

The internet giant released its annual survey of popular global search terms. Find out what people and events ranked highest in China, India, Japan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and more.

Photo of the Day: Philippines Flood

Multimedia

Two boys look at a destroyed house in Iligan City, in southern island of Mindanao, Philippines on December 19, 2011. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

Lee: With Kim Jong Il Dead, a Chance to Normalize Inter-Korean Relations

Kim Il Sung (L) and Kim Jong Il are pictured in this piece of propaganda art photographed in North Korea. (Flickr/yeowatzup)
Policy

Kim Jong Il is dead. While it is never clear whether history creates a leader, or a leader creates history, one thing is clear: The more a leader dominates power over a nation, the more its regime's fate will be changed by that leader’s death. So where is North Korea headed after Kim Jong Il’s death?

2011: Five Pakistani Cultural Events You Might Have Missed

Promotional photo for <em>Karachi: The Musical</em>, directed and produced by Nida Butt in fall 2011.
Arts

In a year when news like the killing of Osama Bin Laden and the perpetually fraying state of U.S.-Pakistani relations dominated headlines, the following are five cultural programs from Pakistan that you might not have heard of in 2011.

2011: A Return to Roots? Lessons From This Year's US Engagement in Asia

U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd R) applauds with Southeast Asian leaders, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (L), Philippines President Benigno Aquino (2nd L) and Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah (R), during a group photo session for the leaders of the East Asia Summit in Nusa Dua on Indonesia's resort island of Bali on November 19, 2011 following the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit. (Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

This is part of a series of year-end posts on Asia Blog written by Asia Society experts and Associate Fellows looking back on noteworthy events in 2011. You can read the entire series here.

Lho: Helping North Korea Escape From a 'Self-Imposed Hell'

Located in Seoul, the War Memorial of Korea was opened in 1994 on the former site of Korean Army headquarters. (Wilson Loo/Flickr)
Policy

There is an old Korean saying that even rivers and mountains change in the space of a decade. And much has changed in the past six decades since the bloody, three-year long conflagration left the Korean peninsula in ashes, having proved little beyond the fact that another such war must be prevented at all costs.

2011: Three Big Stories Out of India You'll Hear More About in 2012

Indians cheer at an Anna Hazare anti-corruption rally in New Delhi on Aug. 24, 2011. (India Kangaroo/Flickr)
Policy

Corruption, agricultural woes and nuclear power will continue to roil India's body politic in the year ahead, according to Mira Kamdar.