Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Keyword: vietnam

Photo of the Day: Too Much Monkey Business in Vietnam

Multimedia

A monkey is chained to a motorcycle basket in Hue, Vietnam on February 21, 2012. (Thang Nguyen /Flickr)

Photo of the Day: Busy Bee at Tet Flower Market

Multimedia

A bee sits on top of a flower during Tet, Vietnam's New Year celebrations at a flower market on January 29, 2012. (Danny Tan /Flickr)

Lunar New Year Celebrations Around World Usher in Year of the Dragon [Photos]

Multimedia

We collected our favorite images from across the globe. Happy New Year!

Obama's Military Commitment in East Asia Fraught With Risk

U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta (C) listens as U.S. President Barack Obama (R) delivers remarks on the Defense Strategic Review at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Also pictured is Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter (L). President Obama vowed Thursday that the U.S. military would maintain its
Policy

The U.S. now needs to manage its Asian alliances carefully, so as not to provoke China in particularly volatile areas like the South China Sea, writes Andrew Billo.

Climate Change, Maids and Refugees: Asian Migration in 2011

Migrant construction workers outside of Bangkok, Thailand. (Flickr/Ronn aka
Policy

In the Asia-Pacific region, large-scale migration continues to be an upwardly trending phenomenon and, sadly, migrant vulnerability and exploitation is glaringly apparent, writes Andrew Billo.

2011: Cooling Temperatures in the South China Sea

A U.S. Coast Guard seaman stands lookout watch in the South China Sea as two Republic of Singapore ships pass by U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Mellon during an exercise as part of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) on July 14, 2010. (CARAT/Flickr)
Policy

After another year of noise and smoke in 2011, temperatures on the issue of South China Sea have cooled down considerably, writes Fudan University's Shen Dingli.

Interview: Tuong Vu, Author of 'Paths to Development in Asia'

<i>Paths to Development in Asia</i> by Tuong Vu, selected as runner-up in the 2011 Bernard Schwartz Book Award.
Policy

Since the economies of East Asia first experienced broad economic growth in the post-World War II era, academics have debated which factors best explain such success. In his book Paths to Development in Asia, University of Oregon Political Science professor Tuong Vu argues that state formation, more than colonial legacy or geography, played a decisive role in explaining such success. Vu's study was selected as a runner-up for Asia Society's 2011 Bernard Schwartz Book Award.

Vietnam Tries to Put Anti-China Genie Back Into the Bottle

Vietnamese protesters shout anti-China slogans at a rally in central Hanoi on Aug. 14, 2011. About 100 people took to Hanoi's streets to protest against Beijing's territorial ambitions in the South China Sea. (Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

On Sunday, the Vietnamese government rounded up and jailed dozens of demonstrators in Hanoi, trying to end a summer of weekly anti-China rallies related to the Spratly Island disputes.

Asian Nations Could Help Form 'Pacific Pollution Patrol'

Waste on a beach in Malaysia. (epSos .de/Flickr)
Sustainability

A recent study from the University of California, San Diego, found that tens of thousands of tons of debris are ingested annually by fish in the Pacific Ocean. In this week's Sustainability Roundtable, we asked our experts how Asia and the United States can cooperate to tackle the problem of pollution in the Pacific Ocean. Is there a chance for collaboration on cleaning and waste management efforts?

Chinese Dilemmas in the South China Sea

Chinese Defense Minister Liang Guanglie gestures during a courtesy visit to Philippine President Benigno Aquino (unseen) at the Malacanang Palace in Manila on May 23, 2011. Aquino said he hoped his talks with Liang would help to avoid a real conflict over the chain of islands in the South China Sea which both countries claim. (Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Aggressive maritime maneuvers may not serve China's long-term interests, says John D. Cioriciari.