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Worldwide Locations

Keyword: foreign policy

Rao: US-India Partnership Aids Both Countries and Global Peace

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (L) shakes hands with then-Indian Foreign Secretary Nirupama Rao (R) in New Delhi on July 18, 2011. Rao is now India's Ambassador to the United States. (Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

In a wide-ranging speech at Asia Society Washington Center, India's Ambassador to the United States calls the India-U.S. partnership "full of hope, promise and opportunities for the benefit our two peoples."

How Washington Gridlock Undercuts America's Pacific Century

U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C. (Flickr/Katie Harbath)
Policy

The U.S. vision over the next 25 years should be for an Asia that is universally open to American people and trade — and an America that is also open to Asia, writes Matt Stumpf.

President Obama May Not Bluff, But He Needs to Engage Iran

Anti-war demonstrators shout slogans as seen from the motorcade of US President Barack Obama as he is leaving after speaking during the AIPAC Policy Conference at the Washington Convention Center on March 4, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

It is now time for Washington to match its pressure tactics with an equally aggressive diplomatic strategy with Iran, writes Asia Society's Suzanne DiMaggio.

United States Must Seize 'Opportunity' in North Korea

US special envoy on North Korea Glyn Davies (C) speaks to the media after the second day of bilateral talks with North Korea in Beijing on February 24, 2012. (Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The current period of both economic want and political transition in North Korea is an opportunity for the United States to achieve some long-held goals, writes Matt Stumpf.

India’s Foreign Policy and Opportunities for Intervention

Maldives President Mohamed Waheed speaks to reporters at his office in Male on February 11, 2012. A top US diplomat arrived in the Maldives on February 11 seeking to help resolve a deepening political crisis sparked by the ousting of the Indian Ocean nation's first democratically elected president. (Ishara S.Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

India has much to gain from its strategic policy with respect to intervention in intra-state conflict, writes Andrew Billo.

Orville Schell's Top 5 Books on China and the West

Orville Schell (R) speaks to Damian Woetzl (L) and Yo Yo Ma at the opening ceremony of the US-China Forum on the Arts and Culture in Beijing on Nov. 17, 2011. (Dong Lin)
Policy

As China rises to power in a tumultuous political and economic environment, the U.S. finds itself struggling to build a relationship with its greatest rival. Perhaps the biggest challenge in this international bridge-building is the conflict between traditional Western and Eastern ways of thinking.

Upcoming Summits Underscore Importance of East Asia in U.S. Strategy

(L to R) Chinese President Hu Jintao, French President Nicolas Sarkozy, U.S. President Barack Obama and Indonesia's President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono stand together for a photograph at the Group of 20 (G20) Cannes Summit at the Palais des Festivals November 3, 2011 in Cannes, France. (Chris Ratcliffe-Pool/Getty Images)
Policy

Earlier today, the Asia Society released a task force report entitled U.S.-East Asia Relations: A Strategy for Multilateral Engagement. This report, compiled by an international group of experts, presents a series of practical recommendations on what the U.S. can do to build constructive relationships with Asian countries.

Chinese Dilemmas in the South China Sea

Chinese Defense Minister Liang Guanglie gestures during a courtesy visit to Philippine President Benigno Aquino (unseen) at the Malacanang Palace in Manila on May 23, 2011. Aquino said he hoped his talks with Liang would help to avoid a real conflict over the chain of islands in the South China Sea which both countries claim. (Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Aggressive maritime maneuvers may not serve China's long-term interests, says John D. Cioriciari.