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Keyword: bo xilai

Watch: China's Bo Xilai Scandal in Less Than 18 Minutes

Screen capture from the Wall Street Journal's new documentary 'Bo Xilai: Inside the Scandal.' (WSJ.com)
Multimedia

The Wall Street Journal takes a look back at the rise and fall of Bo Xilai with a short documentary by Josh Chin. 

Interview: Ian Johnson on China's Caves, Politics and Air Quality

Ian Johnson in Beijing in 1984, before the city's air pollution got to him. (Hong Kong Economic Journal)
Lifestyle

Asia Society Associate Fellow Jeffrey Wasserstrom caught up with the Pulitzer Prize-winning Beijing-based journalist in advance of his June 21 appearance at Asia Society New York.

China's Microbloggers Ask: What's the Net Worth of Our Government Officials?

Chairman Mao on China's 100 yuan note. (super.heavy/Flickr)
Policy

Asia Society Associate Fellow Steven Lewis says state-sponsored Chinese media's coverage of a call for disclosure of finances by government officials could put transparency "on the table" at the National Congress later this year.

The Paradox of China's Reform

A man begs on a street as a woman passes by in Shanghai on May 9, 2012. China could face an economic crisis in the next 20 years if it does not quickly overhaul its development model, World Bank and Chinese government researchers warned recently. (Peter Parks/AFP/GettyImages)
Policy

If China’s national imperative today is reform, the greatest threat to that goal is the massive influence and institutionalized corruption of the country’s entrenched elites, writes Asia Society Senior Fellow Jamie Metzl.

Shanghai, Bo Xilai and 5 China Noirs You Should Read this Summer

The scandal surrounding ousted Chinese official Bo Xilai (L) got Asia Society Associate Fellow Jeffrey Wasserstrom thinking about some of his favorite noir books about China. (Bo Xilai photo by Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)
Arts

After a brief primer on the "wicked old treaty port" of Shanghai, Asia Society Associate Fellow Jeffrey Wasserstrom suggests some China-crime-themed summer reading.

Bo Xilai Wiretapping Scandal Reveals 'Paranoia' Within Chinese Leadership

Bo Xilai (C), former Communist Party secretary of Chongqing arrives next to Chinese President Hu Jintao (R) and Premier Wen Jiabao (L) during the third plenary session of the National People's Congress's (NPC) annual session at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 9, 2012. (Liu Jin/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society Associate Fellow Jeffrey Wasserstrom tells CBS News the revelation that Bo Xilai wiretapped high-level Chinese leaders shows 'paranoia' and 'divisions' within the leadership.

Schell: Beijing Had 'Knives Out' for 'Theatrical' Bo Xilai

Policy

Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director of Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations, appeared on PBS Newshour last night to talk about the scandal surrounding the dramatic fall of Chinese government official Bo Xilai and his wife Gu Kailai.

Expert: Bo Xilai Scandal No Tiananmen, 'Not Terribly Significant'

A Chinese policeman blocks photos from being taken outside Zhongnanhai, central headquarters for China's Communist Party, after the sacking of politician Bo Xilai from the country's powerful Politburo, in Beijing on April 11, 2012. (Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society Associate Fellow Steven Lewis says the Bo Xilai scandal is similar to the ousting of other public officials in China, just with more media on hand to pay attention.

Fact, Fiction and the News Out of China

Artist Ai Weiwei holds a webcam that he was reportedly ordered by Chinese police to disconnect, at his home in Beijing on April 5, 2012. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society Associate Fellow Jeffrey Wasserstrom discusses Ai Weiwei, Mike Daisey, Bo Xilai, Neil Heywood and the "blurry divide" between real and unreal in recent China news.

Karl Marx and China's Big Chill 2.0

This statue of Karl Marx (L) and Friedrich Engels graces Shanghai's Fuxing Park. (Hennie Schaper/Flickr)
Policy

As China embarks on another internet crackdown in the name of maintaining stability, Jeffrey Wasserstrom calls into question the predictive powers of Karl Marx.