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Keyword: xi jinping

Orville Schell: A 'More Even Keel' for US-China Relations?

Chinese and American Vice Presidents Xi Jinping and Joe Biden visit Asia Society’s International Studies Learning Center in Los Angeles on Feb. 17, 2012. (Courtesy of the school)
Policy

The Director of Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations and other experts share insights into what Xi Jinping brings to the U.S-China relationship.

Tiger, Tiger: Can the US and China 'Live Harmoniously'?

US President Barack Obama and Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping speak during meetings in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, February 14, 2012. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The two countries must not allow election year hysteria and nationalist forces to taint what will continue to be an essential, albeit challenging, relationship, write Andrew Billo and Yan Shufen.

On US Visit, China's Xi Jinping Will 'Only Be Able to Go So Far'

US Vice President Joe Biden (R) shakes hands with Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington, DC, February 14, 2012. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society's Mike Kulma says Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping's visit to the U.S. is a coming-out party for the presumptive new president that will do little to address thorny issues in China-U.S. relations.

Xi Jinping and U.S.-China Relations in the Shadow of the Arab Spring

Future Chinese president Xi Jinping will visit the United States next week. (Luong Thai Linh/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Contrasts between the way some diplomatic topics are thought about on opposite sides of the Pacific can be striking, and these different worldviews can complicate meetings between leaders, writes Jeffrey Wasserstrom.

What Will Hu Jintao Think of 'Titanic 3D'?

The original 'Titanic' was a big hit in mainland China. Will its upcoming 3D release be seen by Chinese leaders as a
Policy

The Chinese leader's recent "cultural war" seems to be part of an unpleasant “new normal” for China, in which any excuse can be used to justify a tightening of control, writes Jeffrey Wasserstrom.