Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Keyword: united states

Xi Jinping and U.S.-China Relations in the Shadow of the Arab Spring

Future Chinese president Xi Jinping will visit the United States next week. (Luong Thai Linh/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Contrasts between the way some diplomatic topics are thought about on opposite sides of the Pacific can be striking, and these different worldviews can complicate meetings between leaders, writes Jeffrey Wasserstrom.

Top Tweets: Pete Hoekstra's Super Bowl Ad Reaches 'New Low'

Screenshot from Pete Hoekstra's controversial ad.
Policy

Racially-charged campaign ad from Republican Senate candidate stirs controversy among pundits.

Schell: Obama's China 'Drive-By'

U.S. House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) listens as President Barack Obama delivers the State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill January 24, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Saul Loeb-Pool/Getty Images)
Policy

In his State of the Union address, U.S. President Barack Obama appealed to the Republican "red meat faction," but kept his China commentary discreet enough not to disrupt U.S.-China relations, writes Orville Schell.

Obama's State of the Union: Much More Than Trying to 'Contain China'

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill January 24, 2012 in Washington, DC. (Saul Loeb-Pool/Getty Images)
Policy

The reality is much broader and deeper, writes Suzanne DiMaggio, who says Obama's Asia "pivot" signals his recognition of an unprecedented shift of economic, political and strategic power to Asia.

Orville Schell's Top 5 Books on China and the West

Orville Schell (R) speaks to Damian Woetzl (L) and Yo Yo Ma at the opening ceremony of the US-China Forum on the Arts and Culture in Beijing on Nov. 17, 2011. (Dong Lin)
Policy

As China rises to power in a tumultuous political and economic environment, the U.S. finds itself struggling to build a relationship with its greatest rival. Perhaps the biggest challenge in this international bridge-building is the conflict between traditional Western and Eastern ways of thinking.

Obama's Military Commitment in East Asia Fraught With Risk

U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta (C) listens as U.S. President Barack Obama (R) delivers remarks on the Defense Strategic Review at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Also pictured is Deputy Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter (L). President Obama vowed Thursday that the U.S. military would maintain its
Policy

The U.S. now needs to manage its Asian alliances carefully, so as not to provoke China in particularly volatile areas like the South China Sea, writes Andrew Billo.

2012: Coming Year's Leadership Transitions Could Have Major Asia Impact

 Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping (R), the presumptive heir to current President Hu Jintao, speaks with former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen  in Beijing on July 11, 2011. Xi is just one of several new world leaders who could have a major impact on Asia in 2012 and beyond. Photo by Chad J. McNeeley. (Flickr/Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff)
Policy

It seems only fitting that at the end of 2011, a year of such tremendous political change around the world, we should all be fixated with intense curiosity on the machinations of a leadership transition in North Korea.

There are many reasons for the events that unfolded into the Arab Spring, but at the root is a failure in leadership. While the Arab Spring did not result in similar uprisings in Asia, the events were followed with tremendous interest throughout the region.

2011: On the U.S. Campaign Trail, a Deficit of Diplomacy

Former Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain made headlines for the wrong reasons with his
Policy

The U.S. presidential campaign heated up in 2011, as Americans ready themselves to vote in November 2012. While the current fiscal environment demands candidates focus on domestic economic challenges and solutions, in our interdependent world, foreign policy has to take a top spot on the list of presidential priorities. Unfortunately, election season is rife with fire and brimstone foreign policy rhetoric, attempting to engage voters at the detriment of diplomacy.

Hassan Abbas: 'How Obama Can Fix U.S.-Pakistani Relations'

Local Pakistani kids await to be evacuated on a CH-60 Blackhawk in Khyber - Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan, on Sept. 13, 2010. Photo By Joshua Kruger. (Flickr/DVIDSHUB)
Policy

As Pakistan struggles with its democratic transition, Asia Society Senior Advisor Hassan Abbas writes in Foreign Affairs that Obama can help Pakistan help itself by taking a less unilateral approach and focusing instead on strengthening Pakistan's civilian government and investing in civil society. Abbas points out: 

2011: A Return to Roots? Lessons From This Year's US Engagement in Asia

U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd R) applauds with Southeast Asian leaders, Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (L), Philippines President Benigno Aquino (2nd L) and Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah (R), during a group photo session for the leaders of the East Asia Summit in Nusa Dua on Indonesia's resort island of Bali on November 19, 2011 following the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Summit. (Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

This is part of a series of year-end posts on Asia Blog written by Asia Society experts and Associate Fellows looking back on noteworthy events in 2011. You can read the entire series here.