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Keyword: death of kim jong il

Stephen W. Bosworth: It's Not Just North Korea That Makes U.S. Engagement Difficult

Former U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy Stephen W. Bosworth at Asia Society New York on January 23, 2012.
Policy

The former U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy explains how domestic politics is one of many factors complicating diplomatic outreach to North Korea.

Reflecting on North Korea’s Political Transition, One Month On

This undated picture, released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on January 12, 2012 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (C) inspecting the planned construction site for the Pyongyang Folk Park, undertaken by Korean People's Army service personnels in Pyongyang. (KNS/KCNA/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Perhaps what is most clear about North Korea’s future is that it remains murky, writes Andrew Billo.

Video: Revisiting South Korean Thoughts on the Death of Kim Jong Il

Policy

The Asia Society South Korea Center asked South Koreans what their thoughts were on the future of the Korean peninsula after the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

Moon: New Actors and New Demands for North Korea

Propaganda art in the Pyongyang Metro in North Korea, photographed in August 2011. (Flickr/Joseph Ferris III)
Policy

Kim Jong Il’s death dealt a blow to the North Korean regime and people. A smooth political transition that places Kim Jong Un, the “Great Successor,” at the helm and consolidates social and political order are Pyongyang’s pressing priorities. No one knows what kind of “order” may ensue.

Jae-Seung Lee: The Moment of Truth for the Two Koreas

(Flickr/mag3737)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's death has created a critical opportunity for the two Koreas to figure out a roadmap for the coming years, writes Korea University's Jae-Seung Lee.

Lee: With Kim Jong Il Dead, a Chance to Normalize Inter-Korean Relations

Kim Il Sung (L) and Kim Jong Il are pictured in this piece of propaganda art photographed in North Korea. (Flickr/yeowatzup)
Policy

Kim Jong Il is dead. While it is never clear whether history creates a leader, or a leader creates history, one thing is clear: The more a leader dominates power over a nation, the more its regime's fate will be changed by that leader’s death. So where is North Korea headed after Kim Jong Il’s death?

Lho: Helping North Korea Escape From a 'Self-Imposed Hell'

Located in Seoul, the War Memorial of Korea was opened in 1994 on the former site of Korean Army headquarters. (Wilson Loo/Flickr)
Policy

There is an old Korean saying that even rivers and mountains change in the space of a decade. And much has changed in the past six decades since the bloody, three-year long conflagration left the Korean peninsula in ashes, having proved little beyond the fact that another such war must be prevented at all costs.

Whiting: During This DPRK Changeover, South Koreans Not Hoarding Rice

Residents walk past newspapers showing the late North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il and his son Kim Jong-Un outside a convenience store in Seoul on December 20, 2011. (Sam Yeh/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

When long-time North Korean dictator Kim Il Sung died in 1994, nervous South Koreans rushed to the stores and hoarded basic necessities such as rice, canned meat and instant noodles in fear of another Korean War. The "Great Leader" was dead and his son, Kim Jong Il was taking over. This was uncharted territory.

Lee: 'Nasty Palace Politics and Back Stabbing' Could Destroy Kim Jong Un

A street peddler shows the North Korean bank notes featuring late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il along the waterfront of Yalu river in Dandong, in China's northeastern Liaoning province on December 20, 2011. (Liu Jin/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

On the surface, North Korea is calmly coping with the sudden death of its Dear Leader Kim Jong Il. His youngest son and heir, Kim Jong Un, seems to be in charge, smoothly preparing a state funeral for the 28th. Pyongyang media already call him “The Great Successor.”

French: Why Kim Jong Un Should Mourn Until 2013

Kim Jong Un (C), dubbed the
Policy

Paul French, author of North Korea: The Paranoid Peninsula, says "we shouldn't expect anything of substance to come out of Pyongyang for a year."