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Keyword: kim jong un

Complex Legacies Follow Northeast Asia's New Leaders

South Korea's president-elect Park Geun-Hye waves to supporters in Seoul on Dec. 19, 2012. (Kim Jae-Hwan/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Princely pedigree and family roots in East Asia's conflicted past run deep among incoming leaders in Beijing, Tokyo, Pyongyang and Seoul.

After Year of Transitions in Northeast Asia, 2013 Needs to Be a Year of Leadership

U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta meets with Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping prior to a meeting in Beijing on Sept. 19, 2012. (U.S. Secretary of Defense/Flickr)
Policy

With a resurgent nationalism just one trend potentially threatening the region, new leaders settling into office need to provide steady hands, says Asia Society's Michael Kulma.

Poll: Who Was Asia's Person of the Year in 2012?

Myanmar president Thein Sein (L) and legislator Aung San Suu Kyi (R) speaking at Asia Society events in 2012. Aung San Suu Kyi was last year's winner of our reader poll for Asia's Person of the Year — will her countryman take her spot this year? (Kenji Takigami/Joshua Roberts)

Asia Blog has compiled a list of 12 of the most newsworthy figures of 2012. It's your turn to vote on who you think had the most impact.

13 Predictions for Asia in 2013

North Korean performers sit beneath a screen showing images of leader Kim Jong-Un at a theatre in Pyongyang, North Korea on April 16, 2012. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)
Lifestyle

Asia Society Executive Vice President Tom Nagorski offers his predictions on Asia for the year to come — but he'd "be surprised if any of them came true."

Experts: Mixed Reactions to Mixed Signals from North Korea's Leader and Its Media

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (C), accompanied by a young woman later confirmed as his wife Ri Sol-Ju (L), enjoying a performance by the newly organized Moranbong band in Pyongyang on July 6, 2012. (KNS/AFP/GettyImages)
Policy

North Korean media have officially dismissed rumors of any impending reforms in the country, but supreme leader Kim's actions suggest something different.

Listen: The Official Theme Song for North Korea's Kim Jong Un

Policy

The "Great Successor" now has his very own propaganda hymn, entitled "Onwards Toward the Final Victory." Watch the video for it here, and download the sheet music.

Interview: Author Blaine Harden on North Korea's Gulags

Blaine Harden and his new book 'Escape From Camp 14.' (Blaine Harden photo by Blake Chambliss)
Policy

Author Blaine Harden discusses his new book, Escape from Camp 14, and the future of North Korea's notorious labor camps.

Interview: Syracuse Talks Show North Korea Wants to 'Engage the World in a New Way'

This undated picture, released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on March 10, 2012 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waving his hand on a naval vessel as he inspects Korean People's Army Navy Unit 123 honored with the title of O Jung Hup-led Seventh Regiment at undisclosed place in North Korea. (KNS/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Charles K. Armstrong says a conference attended by a North Korea nuclear envoy showed the country is continuing to implement, and even accelerating negotiation efforts put in motion before the death of Kim Jong Il.

Interview: Charles Armstrong on the Fallacy of North Korean 'Instability'

What does the future of North Korea hold? (Taylor Sloan/Flickr)
Policy

Armstrong, Asia Society Associate Fellow and Professor of Korean Studies at Columbia University, is appearing Jan. 23 in a panel discussion on North Korea's future at Asia Society New York.

Reflecting on North Korea’s Political Transition, One Month On

This undated picture, released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on January 12, 2012 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (C) inspecting the planned construction site for the Pyongyang Folk Park, undertaken by Korean People's Army service personnels in Pyongyang. (KNS/KCNA/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Perhaps what is most clear about North Korea’s future is that it remains murky, writes Andrew Billo.