Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Keyword: north korea

Gallup: Americans Like China Less Now Than They Did a Year Ago

(Flickr/Brent Finnegan)
Lifestyle

Several Asian nations held up the rear of a Gallup poll released yesterday measuring Americans' favorability toward foreign countries.

Stephen W. Bosworth: It's Not Just North Korea That Makes U.S. Engagement Difficult

Former U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy Stephen W. Bosworth at Asia Society New York on January 23, 2012.
Policy

The former U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy explains how domestic politics is one of many factors complicating diplomatic outreach to North Korea.

Interview: Charles Armstrong on the Fallacy of North Korean 'Instability'

What does the future of North Korea hold? (Taylor Sloan/Flickr)
Policy

Armstrong, Asia Society Associate Fellow and Professor of Korean Studies at Columbia University, is appearing Jan. 23 in a panel discussion on North Korea's future at Asia Society New York.

Reflecting on North Korea’s Political Transition, One Month On

This undated picture, released from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency on January 12, 2012 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (C) inspecting the planned construction site for the Pyongyang Folk Park, undertaken by Korean People's Army service personnels in Pyongyang. (KNS/KCNA/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Perhaps what is most clear about North Korea’s future is that it remains murky, writes Andrew Billo.

Video: Revisiting South Korean Thoughts on the Death of Kim Jong Il

Policy

The Asia Society South Korea Center asked South Koreans what their thoughts were on the future of the Korean peninsula after the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

Moon: New Actors and New Demands for North Korea

Propaganda art in the Pyongyang Metro in North Korea, photographed in August 2011. (Flickr/Joseph Ferris III)
Policy

Kim Jong Il’s death dealt a blow to the North Korean regime and people. A smooth political transition that places Kim Jong Un, the “Great Successor,” at the helm and consolidates social and political order are Pyongyang’s pressing priorities. No one knows what kind of “order” may ensue.

2012: Coming Year's Leadership Transitions Could Have Major Asia Impact

 Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping (R), the presumptive heir to current President Hu Jintao, speaks with former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen  in Beijing on July 11, 2011. Xi is just one of several new world leaders who could have a major impact on Asia in 2012 and beyond. Photo by Chad J. McNeeley. (Flickr/Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff)
Policy

It seems only fitting that at the end of 2011, a year of such tremendous political change around the world, we should all be fixated with intense curiosity on the machinations of a leadership transition in North Korea.

There are many reasons for the events that unfolded into the Arab Spring, but at the root is a failure in leadership. While the Arab Spring did not result in similar uprisings in Asia, the events were followed with tremendous interest throughout the region.

Jae-Seung Lee: The Moment of Truth for the Two Koreas

(Flickr/mag3737)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's death has created a critical opportunity for the two Koreas to figure out a roadmap for the coming years, writes Korea University's Jae-Seung Lee.

Lee: With Kim Jong Il Dead, a Chance to Normalize Inter-Korean Relations

Kim Il Sung (L) and Kim Jong Il are pictured in this piece of propaganda art photographed in North Korea. (Flickr/yeowatzup)
Policy

Kim Jong Il is dead. While it is never clear whether history creates a leader, or a leader creates history, one thing is clear: The more a leader dominates power over a nation, the more its regime's fate will be changed by that leader’s death. So where is North Korea headed after Kim Jong Il’s death?

Lho: Helping North Korea Escape From a 'Self-Imposed Hell'

Located in Seoul, the War Memorial of Korea was opened in 1994 on the former site of Korean Army headquarters. (Wilson Loo/Flickr)
Policy

There is an old Korean saying that even rivers and mountains change in the space of a decade. And much has changed in the past six decades since the bloody, three-year long conflagration left the Korean peninsula in ashes, having proved little beyond the fact that another such war must be prevented at all costs.