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Worldwide Locations

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Japan's Human Tragedy and the Confidence of a Nation

A religious statue stands among the rubble in Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture on March 17, 2011 after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. (NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
Lifestyle

Asia Society Associate Fellow Ayako Doi contributed a special report to Fareed Zakaria's "Global Public Square" (or GPS) blog on CNN.com yesterday.

In Japan's Wake, Can Nuclear be Relied Upon to Fuel Asia's Boom?

Anti-nuclear activists hold a protest near the presidential palace in Manila on March 15, 2011. (TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society Global Council Co-Chair Simon Tay has penned an op-ed entitled "Japan gives Asia pause in its nuclear ambitions," published earlier this week in Singapore's Today newspaper and the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong.

Rising Food Prices: Eight Months and Counting…

East Timorese residents of Dili haul bags of rice as they loot empty homes during political turmoil in Dili, East Timor, in 2006. (Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Business Global food prices have risen to their highest levels ever recorded since the UN Food and Agriculture Organization began its price index more than 20 years ago. So how has Asia been impacted by these price increases?

How to Reform Schools: Lessons from the Best

(pmorgan/flickr)
Education

It's a fact: American students' academic achievements are falling desperately behind their peers worldwide. It's not surprising considering the state of American schools: one in three students in American never graduate and only one in two students in urban centers have a high school diploma.

It's also true that nations with declining education systems will also suffer economically as a result. In short, American schools are not preparing the rising generation for the global knowledge economy of the future.

Japan's Disaster: Assessing the Long-Term Effects

 A survivor wrapped in a blanket stands to look on tsunami-damaged town at Ishinomaki city in Miyagi prefecture on March 13, 2011. (Yomiuri Shimbun /AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The March 11 earthquake and tsunami, and the nuclear plant explosions that followed, are the biggest national emergency Japan has faced since World War II. As the scale of the damage emerges, how the Japanese government responds will determine more than the fate of hundreds of thousands of people in the areas affected. It will also shape the country's direction for many years to come.

Aussie PM Gillard Wows Washington with Football, Tears, History

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard addresses the US Congress in Washington on Mar. 9, 2011. Seated behind Gillard are US Senator Daniel Inouye (D-HI) (R), and President Pro Tempore, and Speaker of the House John Boehner. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy Nothing much new was expected to come from the first visit to Washington, DC by Australia's first female Prime Minister, Julia Gillard. And nothing new really did.

For the 21st Century: More Female Voices at the Table

Asia Society President Vishakha Desai
Policy

On March 8, 2011 over 100 countries celebrated International Women's Day, and throughout March, hundreds of events will not only mark the accomplishments of women but also raise awareness about women’s rights issues.

While celebrating and reflecting, Asia Society President Vishakha Desai says we must also "remind ourselves of the dramatically changed context of the world in the early decades of the 21st century and its implications for women."

How to Improve China-US Trust

US President Barack Obama stands with Chinese President Hu Jintao (L) during a State Arrival ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, on Jan. 19, 2011. (Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Note: The following is from an Op-Ed published on The Diplomat by Asia Society Fellow Shen Dingli, Director for the Center of American Studies at Shanghai's Fudan University.

China, Eyeing Mideast Revolts, Halts Even Minor Protests

Arthur Ross Director of the Center on US-China Relations Orville Schell explains how China's government is dealing with dissent on Feb. 28, 2011 (interview, below).
Policy

With the populist uprisings across the Middle East showing no signs of losing steam as they head into their third month, policy experts are keeping a close eye on China to see if and how the government there chooses to acknowledge the Arab world's political turmoil. So far, all indications seem to be that Beijing intends to keep a tight lid on political dissent.

Five Books to Pick Up If You're Headed to China

Evan Osnos at Asia Society New York. (Elsa Ruiz/Asia Society)
Lifestyle

Planning a trip to China? New Yorker correspondent and Asia Society award winner Evan Osnos recommends the best five books for the discerning traveler—from our friends at The Browser.