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Complete Text of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani's Address to Asia Society

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani delivers remarks at the Hilton Hotel in New York City on September 26, 2013. (Kenji Takigami/Asia Society)
Policy

Click to read the complete English translation of the speech given by Dr. Hassan Rouhani, president of of Iran, on Thursday, September 26, 2013, at the Hilton Hotel in New York City.

Video: What to Look for When Myanmar's Thein Sein Visits the White House

Policy

Asia Society's Vice President of Global Policy Programs Suzanne DiMaggio says the meeting is an opportunity for both leaders to "further solidify the normalization process of U.S.-Myanmar relations."

Thai Prime Minister: 'Woman's Touch' Needed in South China Sea Dispute

Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra addresses the crowd at Asia Society New York on Wednesday, September 26, 2012. (Elsa Ruiz/Asia Society)
Policy

Yingluck Shinawatra said her government will "make every effort to help build trust and confidence" among parties in the South China Sea disputes in a speech at Asia Society in New York.

Thailand's Yingluck Shinawatra Turning From 'Stopgap' to a Lasting Presence

Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra waves as she arrives to attend the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Vladivostok, Russia on Sept. 8, 2012. (Saeed Khan/AFP/GettyImages)
Policy

Asia Society Associate Fellow Duncan McCargo says Thailand Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra has been proving the experts wrong with her political savvy and brokering skills.

2012: Coming Year's Leadership Transitions Could Have Major Asia Impact

 Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping (R), the presumptive heir to current President Hu Jintao, speaks with former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen  in Beijing on July 11, 2011. Xi is just one of several new world leaders who could have a major impact on Asia in 2012 and beyond. Photo by Chad J. McNeeley. (Flickr/Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff)
Policy

It seems only fitting that at the end of 2011, a year of such tremendous political change around the world, we should all be fixated with intense curiosity on the machinations of a leadership transition in North Korea.

There are many reasons for the events that unfolded into the Arab Spring, but at the root is a failure in leadership. While the Arab Spring did not result in similar uprisings in Asia, the events were followed with tremendous interest throughout the region.

Lee: 'Nasty Palace Politics and Back Stabbing' Could Destroy Kim Jong Un

A street peddler shows the North Korean bank notes featuring late North Korean leaders Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il along the waterfront of Yalu river in Dandong, in China's northeastern Liaoning province on December 20, 2011. (Liu Jin/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

On the surface, North Korea is calmly coping with the sudden death of its Dear Leader Kim Jong Il. His youngest son and heir, Kim Jong Un, seems to be in charge, smoothly preparing a state funeral for the 28th. Pyongyang media already call him “The Great Successor.”

French: Why Kim Jong Un Should Mourn Until 2013

Kim Jong Un (C), dubbed the
Policy

Paul French, author of North Korea: The Paranoid Peninsula, says "we shouldn't expect anything of substance to come out of Pyongyang for a year."

Gilholm: Kim Jong Il's Death Reduces Regime's Life Expectancy

A portrait of the late Kim Jong Il in Pyongyang, North Korea. (Joseph A Ferris III/Flickr)
Policy

Kim Jong Il's reported death on December 17 is the biggest shock to the country's regime since the passing of his father in 1994. Forecasting what will happen to an authoritarian regime after a leadership succession is inherently rather speculative, and nowhere is this more true than in North Korea. However, we can venture a few observations, and in very broad terms estimate the probability of various types of scenarios.

Stumpf: Kim Jong Il's Death an Opportunity for US, China

The front pages of Tokyo's major evening newspapers report the death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il on December 19, 2011 in Tokyo. (Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

It would be understandable if, observing the post-Kim Jong Il era, the United States, China, South Korea and Japan saw more peril than promise. However, the history of North Korean negotiation indicates a small possibility of progress toward peace on the Korean peninsula and North Korea’s denuclearization.

Lintner: North Korea's King is Dead, But the Military Still Rules

North Korean leader Kim Jong Il waves from a car after the meeting with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev at Sosnovy Bor Military Garrison, Zaigrayevsky District, Buryatia outside Ulan-Ude on August 24, 2011. (Dmitry Astakhov/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The King is dead! Long live the King! The old European cry when a monarch died and a new one took over was meant to prevent any argument over succession and make sure the throne was never empty. And this could just as well apply to North Korea today. Kim Jong Il had already a year before he died anointed his successor, his youngest son Kim Jong Un.