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Keyword: author:jeffreywasserstrom

Wasserstrom: Making a China Book List — and Then Checking It Twice

Three more of the books on China from 2012 that made an impression on historian Jeffrey Wasserstrom. (Asia Society)
Policy

Historian Jeffrey Wasserstrom praises some additional books on China from 2012 that didn't make his initial year-end selection.

To Understand China, Does It Help To Be From Minnesota?

An overcast day over the old and new China. (**Maurice**/Flickr)
Policy

Associate Fellow Jeffrey Wasserstrom contemplates whether U.S. reporters and writers from Minnesota who cover China well are stealing the mantle from the previous leader, Missouri.

The 5 Biggest Chinese News Stories of Summer 2011

Workers clear wreckage on July 24, 2011 near the city of Wenzhou, in Zhejiang province, after a high-speed train collision a day before. The crash was China's worst rail accident since 2008. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy Jeffrey Wasserstrom and Evan Osnos assess Biden's visit, the high-speed train crash, and other top stories of the past three months.

Mark Twain, William Shakespeare and Jiang Zemin

An elderly man looks at portraits of former Chinese communist leaders (L to R) Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping, Jiang Zemin and current president Hu Jintao in Ditan Park in Beijing on June 28, 2011. (Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

As my friends know, it doesn’t take much to make me think of Mark Twain. And even people I’ve never met who have followed my writings on China know about my obsession with Twain, since I’ve managed to bring him into discussions of a wide range of China-related topics, from Shanghai history (he never went there but has a San Francisco-bound fictional character set sail from that treaty port) to the Boxers (with whose cause he expressed sympathy in 1900). So, it’s no surprise that, when rumors about Jiang Zemin’s death flew and then were squashed earlier this week, I found myself thinking of Twain.

As CCP Turns 90, Time For 'Backward Glances' and 'Symbolic Gestures'

A Chinese military band practices inside the Great Hall of the People in Beijing before celebrations start for the Chinese Communist Party's 90th anniversary on July 1, 2011. (Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society Associate Fellow Jeffrey Wasserstrom has a piece in Miller-McCune magazine set to coincide with today's 90th anniversary of the Chineses Anniversary. In "Whose Road Led to Hu’s China?" Wasserstrom — author of China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know — asks, "What kinds of historical echoes sound loudest in today’s China?