Worldwide Locations

Worldwide Locations

Keyword: human rights

Interview: 'Brave Women Made Our Work Possible,' Says WSJ South Asia Bureau Chief

In response to the recent gang-rape and death of two teenage girls in the state of Uttar Pradesh, activists shout slogans in front of Uttar Pradesh Bhawan in New Delhi on May 31, 2014. (Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images)
Current Affairs

"For women in villages, traditional codes of conduct can still trump the laws of the state," says Osborn Elliott Prize finalist Gordon Fairclough of the Wall Street Journal.

When Will Sri Lanka End Its Silence?

Sri Lankan policemen look on as Tamil pro-government activists take part in a demonstration outside the UN offices in Colombo on March 10, 2014, to protest a proposed US-led UN resolution to investigate Sri Lanka for alleged war crimes. (Lakruwan Wanniarachchi/AFP/Getty Images)
Current AffairsPolicy

It's obvious the situation in Sri Lanka has improved since the end of the civil war, but the government’s loftier and more consequential promises remain unfulfilled, writes Bhavani Fonseka.

Interview: Photographer Sheds Light on 'Inner Face' of Bangladesh's Gay Community

Gazi Nafis Ahmed's latest documentary series,
Multimedia

In stark black-and-white images, Gazi Nafis Ahmed takes an intimate look at Bangladesh's marginalized gay community.

Interview: MSF Doctor on Afghanistan's Steep Challenges to Women's Health

Bamiyan, 2009: An Afghan midwife helps a mother nurse her newborn baby at the Bamiyan Provincial hospital. Photo featured in the ART WORKS exhibition
Policy

Severine Caluwaerts of Médecins Sans Frontières explains why women's health is such an uphill struggle in Afghanistan. In-person appearance at Asia Society New York this Thursday, October 3.

Photos: 'Made in Bangladesh' Takes Behind-the-Scenes Look at Garment Workers

Garment worker leaders form a human chain in front of the Jatiya Press Club, demanding punishment for the killers of Aminul Islam, in Dhaka, Bangladesh. (Gazi Nafis Ahmed)
Multimedia

A young socially-minded Bangladeshi photographer turns his lens on his country's garment factories and the workers who brave hazardous conditions in them to scrape together a living.

Photos: In Legal Limbo, Myanmar Refugees in Thailand Eke Out a Living at Trash Dump

Three refugee children work together at the dump in Mae Sot, Thailand. The child on the left is just seven years old and recently received a pair of gumboots. (Jacques Maudy)
Multimedia

Photographer Jacques Maudy, who has photographed the heritage buildings of Yangon, Myanmar, recently crossed the border into Thailand to document the hardscrabble lives of Burmese refugees there.

Listen: Experts Discuss a Strategy for Putting an End to Human Trafficking

Members of the United Nations Police Unit (UNPOL) and the National Police Force carry out a special operation targeting human trafficking in Indonesia in 2008. (United Nations Photo/flickr)
Policy

Asia Society recently hosted a phone briefing on human trafficking for its corporate members with experts from the law firm Arnold and Porter. Click the link to listen to the discussion.

To Ensure Peace and Justice, International Community Must Lead by Example

Former Thai prime minister Abhisit Vejjajiva (C) arrives at the Bangkok Metropolitan Police headquarters on Dec. 9, 2011 for questioning over a deadly military crackdown he oversaw on mass opposition protests in Bangkok in April and May of 2010. (Joan Manuel Baliellas/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

A critical question confronts Thailand, Sri Lanka and other Asian nations: Is lasting peace possible in the absence of justice?

Government Fiddles While Indonesia's Workforce Burns

Indonesian workers display placards during a rally in Jakarta on Nov. 21, 2012, when thousands of workers took to the streets calling on the government to increase wages and end the practice of outsourcing manpower. (Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

A wage increase in Jakarta this week doesn't go far enough in settling labor disputes that are roiling the country's manufacturing sector, says Associate Fellow Michael Buehler.

Private-Public Collaboration Key to Better Treatment of Migrant Workers

Chinese migrant workers leave their factory construction site for a lunch break in Beijing on March 16, 2012. (Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

In Asia, as in the U.S., business benefits from a cheap, reliable labor force that can be coerced into working long hours without protest. But can the private sector be enlisted to help curb these abuses?