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Category: Policy

Video: Why We Know So Little About China's Leadership Change and Its Next Leader

Chinese President Hu Jintao (Front) and Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping (Back) attend the banquet marking the 63th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 29, 2012 at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China. (Feng Li/Getty Images)

As the United States votes for its next president, China, too, is preparing for a leadership change — although much less is known about that process, which begins Thursday with the start of the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China. Orville Schell attempts to shed light on this opaque political exercise.

Orville Schell: Beijing on Edge as It Gropes Way Toward New Leadership

Beijing's Tiananmen Square, photographed in October 2012. (duggadugdug/Flickr)

With no script and no "big leader" in place for China's next act, both officials and ordinary citizens are in the grip of deep unease about the future.

Video Roundup: China in This Year's U.S. Presidential Campaign Ads

A screenshot from a recent Obama ad depicting a hypothetical Romney presidency.

President Barack Obama and former Governor Mitt Romney have both tried to outdo each other in tough talk on China during this election.

Hurricane Sandy: Could Extreme Weather Spur Reform in US as it Did in Myanmar?

Aerial views of the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy to the New Jersey coast taken during a search and rescue mission by 1-150 Assault Helicopter Battalion, New Jersey Army National Guard, October 30, 2012. (DVIDSHUB/Flickr)

In 2008 Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar, causing massive devastation but spurring reform. Can Sandy push America to tackle climate change?

Eyeing New Press Freedoms Next Door, China's Netizens Develop 'Myanmar Envy'

National League for Democracy supporters cheer as they parade ahead of the parliamentary elections in Yangon, Myanmar on March 30, 2012. (Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

When Myanmar’s opposition leader and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi began her visit to the United States in September, Chinese netizens were watching closely.

Most of World Favors Obama Over Romney in Landslide; Why is Pakistan Different?

A Pakistani United Citizen Action demonstrator holds a burning US flag during a protest in Multan on October 25, 2012 against the US drone attacks in Pakistani tribal areas. (S.S. Mirza/AFP/Getty Images)

Pakistani blogger and journalist M. Bilal Lakhani explains what may be behind the results of a recent BBC poll, and why neither U.S. candidate is particularly popular in Pakistan.

Expert: Romney's Whole Foreign Policy Strategy One Big 'Gaffe'

U.K. Foreign Secretary William Hague meeting Governor Mitt Romney in London on July 26, 2012. (Foreign and Commonwealth Office/Flickr)

Associate Fellow Thom Woodroofe argues that Barack Obama is the first Democratic president since Franklin Roosevelt to head to the polls with a foreign policy advantage, owing to an error-prone strategy from Governor Romney.

Chinese Concerns About Fairness Shake Faith in Government Leadership

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama (L) and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) pose with International Women of Courage Award-winner Guo Jianmei, a Chinese lawyer and rights activist, at the Department of State in Washington, DC on March 8, 2011. (Roshan Nebhrajani/Medill DC/Flickr)

Asia 21 Fellow Wenchi Yu says a recent survey shows pervasive concerns among Chinese about the country's leadership and its ability to deal with fundamental human rights.

How It Played Abroad: Asia Society's Asia 21 Leaders React to the 'Foreign Policy' Debate

Governor Mitt Romney (L) and U.S. President Barack Obama (R) squaring off in the third 2012 U.S. Presidential debate, as seen at a debate viewing party in Covina, Virginia on Oct. 22, 2012. (Neon Tommy/Flickr)

After the U.S. presidential candidates sounded off on foreign policy, Asia Society receives reactions from its network of Asia 21 Young Leaders in China, Afghanistan, and Pakistan.

By Bashing 'China Inc.,' US Presidential Candidates Miss the Point

U.S. President Barack Obama (R) debates with Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney (L) as moderator Bob Schieffer (C) listens at Lynn University on Oct. 22, 2012 in Boca Raton, Florida. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

One of China's best-known bloggers says Romney and Obama miss the point of the China-U.S. relationship by focusing on trade and economics while skipping larger issues of liberty and human rights.