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Worldwide Locations

Category: Policy

United States Must Seize 'Opportunity' in North Korea

US special envoy on North Korea Glyn Davies (C) speaks to the media after the second day of bilateral talks with North Korea in Beijing on February 24, 2012. (Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The current period of both economic want and political transition in North Korea is an opportunity for the United States to achieve some long-held goals, writes Matt Stumpf.

The World, Not Australia, Could be Rudd's Stage

Former Australian prime minister and then foreign minister Kevin Rudd gestures during a press conference following the Labor leadership challenge at Parliament House in Canberra on February 27, 2012. (Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

After his failed political comeback in Canberra, Kevin Rudd might be better served as President of the World Bank, writes Andrew Billo.

Orville Schell: A 'More Even Keel' for US-China Relations?

Chinese and American Vice Presidents Xi Jinping and Joe Biden visit Asia Society’s International Studies Learning Center in Los Angeles on Feb. 17, 2012. (Courtesy of the school)
Policy

The Director of Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations and other experts share insights into what Xi Jinping brings to the U.S-China relationship.

Interview: Robert Barnett on Why Tibetans Are Setting Themselves on Fire

Tibetans offer prayers near mock coffins to represent the victims self-immolation during a rally in Siliguri, in the Indian state of West Bengal, on February 8, 2012. China said February 7 it would 'resolutely crack down' on any attempts to instigate violence in Tibetan-inhabited areas, where authorities have launched a deadly clampdown on protesters. (Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Current tensions — including Tibetan monks and nuns using self-immolation as a form of protest — are not going to disappear without some concession from China's government, says a leading Tibet expert.

Tiger, Tiger: Can the US and China 'Live Harmoniously'?

US President Barack Obama and Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping speak during meetings in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, February 14, 2012. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

The two countries must not allow election year hysteria and nationalist forces to taint what will continue to be an essential, albeit challenging, relationship, write Andrew Billo and Yan Shufen.

In Australia, It's Rudd vs. Gillard, Part II

Will Australia's Kevin Rudd have the last laugh? (Alan Porritt/Pool/Getty Images)
Policy

Even veteran MPs, who regularly slug it out in Australia’s parliament, are taken aback by Kevin Rudd’s dramatic comeback campaign, writes Geoff Spencer.

Excerpt: Ahmed Rashid's 'Pakistan on the Brink'

A Pakistani man reads a newspaper with the front page displaying news of the death of Osama bin Laden at a stall in Lahore on May 3, 2011. (Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Leading Pakstani journalist Ahmed Rashid lays out America’s options with Pakistan and Afghanistan in the post-Bin Laden years.

Looking Back at Japan's Occupation of Singapore, 70 Years On

A picture shows the four pillars of the Civilian War Memorial standing 70 metres high in Singapore. The memorial is one of Singapore's most famous landmarks built in memory of civilians killed during the Japanese occupation of Singapore in World War II. (Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

To this day historians bicker over what happened and why, writes Asia Society's Geoff Spencer.

6 Things the US Should Do to Spur Change in Myanmar

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (L) and opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi meet in Yangon, Myanmar, December 1, 2011. (Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society is releasing a new report today — Advancing Myanmar's Transition: A Way Forward for U.S. Policy — co-authored by Suzanne DiMaggio and Priscilla Clapp, formerly the Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Burma.

On US Visit, China's Xi Jinping Will 'Only Be Able to Go So Far'

US Vice President Joe Biden (R) shakes hands with Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington, DC, February 14, 2012. (Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)
Policy

Asia Society's Mike Kulma says Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping's visit to the U.S. is a coming-out party for the presumptive new president that will do little to address thorny issues in China-U.S. relations.